Arquivo para categoria Podcast Inglesonline

Podcast com dicas de idioms e phrasal verbs de inglês intermediário em áudio.

Como falo em inglês: É OK, mas nada demais

How’s it going?

Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre idioms com a palavra NOTHING! Não perca.

Observação: Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

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Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

[audio:http://media.blubrry.com/podcast_ingls_online/www.inglesonline.com.br/mp3/podcast-nothingwrite.mp3]

Transcrição

inglês: nothingHow’s it going? You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy!

So in today’s episode we’ll focus on the word ‘nothing’ for a little bit. First of all, listen to it again: nothing. Did you notice I did not say “NÓ-thing”? I said it more like “nothing”. Just something to notice – we speak Portuguese as our native language and because of the sounds of Portuguese, we would tend to read a word such as nothing this way: NÓ-thing. So pay attention from now on every time you come across this word, hopefully because you’ve heard it: nothing.

And here’s something people say a lot – it’s our first expression of today: it’s nothing personal. When someone says that to you, they’re trying to tell you that whatever behaviour they’ve had or decision they’ve made was not meant to criticise or offend you. It doesn’t mean you’re not a good person or whatever quality may be related to that decision. It doesn’t even mean that they don’t like you. They may have made their decision purely based on objective factors.

For example, let’s take a job interview. You had a great time with the interviewer, you guys hit it off and chatted for twenty minutes, uninterruptedly. You thought “It’s in the bag”. But then you get a call from that same person two days later, saying that they had a look at your resumé and realised that they need a couple of skills for the position… and, unfortunately, at this time these are skills that you don’t possess. “It’s nothing personal”, the interviewer says. “I liked you as a candidate but we really need those skills”.

Obviously sometimes people will say that in an insincere or sarcastic way. Of course! If you watch lots of American films or TV shows you’ve probably come across it before. Example: someone says “Hey, we don’t need your services anymore. Nothing personal!” when it’s obvious they have made that decision because maybe you brought carrot cake to work the day before and didn’t ask your coworkers if they wanted a bite. You get the picture. By the way, that reminds me of a somewhat similar expression, no offense, which has been featured in a previous episode – have a listen.

And here’s another one that I’ve heard a lot in the past few years: it’s nothing to write home about. When you say something is nothing to write home about, what you’re saying is… this thing I’m talking about? It’s nothing special. It’s really unremarkable, or not that great. If I were to sit down and write a letter to my folks back home, I would certainly not include that bit of news in my letter – because it’s nothing to write home about, really.

Can you think about something in your life right now that would make you say – it’s nothing to write home about? Maybe it’s your cell phone. It may be your bicycle, or the food place you go to for lunch, or the performance of your coworker. Let me know what you come up with, and talk to you next time!

 

Key expressions

  • nothing personal
  • nothing to write home about

 

Vocabulary

You guys hit it off = vocês se deram muito bem

It’s in the bag = está no papo

You get the picture = (acho que) você entende

Como falo em inglês: Vou nessa

Hi. What’s up?

Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre maneiras de dizer em inglês “vou nessa”. Não perca!

Observação: Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

[audio:http://media.blubrry.com/podcast_ingls_online/www.inglesonline.com.br/mp3/podcast-shootoff.mp3]

Transcrição

Hi. What’s up? You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy!

So today let’s review a few different ways to let other people know that you’re leaving. Most of these are very informal, so they’re not idioms that you would normally say in a business environment, unless you were sure it’d be ok to do so. And again, this is to let people know that you’re leaving somewhere, that you are saying good-bye, that you’re going somewhere else. And now that I think of it, in Brazil we lots of ways to say that we’re leaving, right? Everyone has a favourite one. Maybe all you do is get up and say “Bye” – I don’t know. Or maybe you’re one of those people who spend ten minutes saying good-bye? I mean, with all those people to hug and kiss, it can take a while. Whatever the case, I think each one of us have our own way of saying farewell.

So our first expression of today is a simple one, and it’s an idiom that I, myself, use a lot: “I’m taking off”. Taking off is something airplanes do… but people can say that too. “I’m going to take off now”. Where’s Jenny? Oh, she took off ten minutes ago. Or, “Everyone, I gotta take off or I’ll be late for class. Bye.”

And when I first moved to London I met someone who would frequently say “I’m going to shoot off now” or just “I got to shoot off” – same meaning as take off. And there’s a way to tell people not only that you’re leaving but let them know where you’re headed – maybe you’re familiar with this one: I’m off to the hairdresser’s. We’re off to the meeting now. “Bye, we’re off to see the play.”

However, there’s something an old landlady of mine used to ask me whenever she saw me heading toward the front door: “Ana, are you off out?” She wanted to know if was heading out, if was leaving the house to go somewhere. So I would reply “Yes, I’m off out” or “Yeah, I’m off to the supermarket” or something. So there you go: “off out” is something you can say to just let people know you’re leaving the house and going out somewhere.

Now here’s another one I’ve heard people say here and there: “Ok, I’ll love you and leave you now. Bye”. It will have sounded a bit funny if that’s the first time you’ve heard it, but that’s exactly how the expression goes: I’ll love you and leave you, or I must love you and leave you. And actually it is sort of a humorous expression, so, again, you wouldn’t say that in a more formal environment. Other than that, feel free to say it to your friends… “Everyone, great catching up with you all but I got to love you and leave you.”

So which ones have you heard for the first time today? Did you know all these ways to basically say good-bye? Which one’s your favourite? Let me know in the comments and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • take off
  • shoot off
  • off out
  • love you and leave you

 

Vocabulary

landlady = proprietária da casa onde eu morava (e pagava aluguel)

Como falo em inglês: O ponteiro do relógio

How have you been?

Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre algumas expressões com a palavra CLOCK, todas – como sempre – muito comuns entre os falantes nativos.

Observação: Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

[audio:http://media.blubrry.com/podcast_ingls_online/www.inglesonline.com.br/mp3/podcast-hourhand.mp3]

Transcrição

How have you been? You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy!

So today let’s talk a little bit about some vocabulary specific to clocks. Sure, ‘clock’ is a very basic word and one that English students learn in their first few lessons… I know. But there’s other stuff that is clock-related, and not talked about that often. So here we go: first of all, every non-digital clock has two hands. Two hands. There’s the hour hand, which is the little hand and it points to the hours. Then there’s the minute hand, which is the big hand, and it points to the minutes.

By now you now what we call the two hands of a clock in Portuguese. So, for example: if it’s three o’clock, the minute hand of a clock will be pointing to the number twelve, and the hour hand of the clock will be pointing to three. If it’s a quarter to eleven, the big hand, or minute hand, will be pointing to nine, and the little hand, or hour hand, will be pointing to the vicinity of number eleven – in fifteen minutes, it will be pointing exactly to eleven. So look to a wall clock near you: what time is it, and what numbers are the hands of the clock pointing to? Right now, for me, it’s almost noon. Almost 12PM. Ten minutes to noon, to be more precise. So the minute hand is pointing at the number ten, and the hour hand is pointing at twelve.

Alright – so, with that bit of business taken care of, let’s take a look at the terms clockwise and counterclockwise. When something is done clockwise, or when something happens clockwise, that means it happens in the direction that the hands of a clock move. Let’s say you’re with a bunch of people in a room doing some kind of group activity and the leader of the activity says “OK, now let’s all form a circle and start slowly moving clockwise round the room.” So now you have all formed a circle, and you and everyone else then took a step to the left and started moving in the same direction the hands of a clock rotate. If you’re having trouble picturing what I’m saying, just imagine a clock on the floor, and then imagine the group formed a circle around that clock. Now imagine the direction in which the minute hand of that clock would move as time passes – so when the group moves clockwise, they’ll be going in the same direction of the movement of the minute hand.

I’m sure it won’t be hard for you to understand what counterclockwise means. Yep, that’s the direction that is opposite to the rotating hands of a clock. So if you’re with the same group in a room and the activity leader says “Ok, so let’s now move counterclockwise round the room” you would all take a step to the right and start moving in the opposite direction to the rotation of the hands of a clock.

So before we wrap up, here’s one other idiom that is very, very common: round the clock, meaning non-stop, day and night, continuously. Sometimes people work on something round the clock – for example, when a deadline is approaching. Or when someone is being watched by the police – the police will have them watched round the clock.

So look at a clock right now – what numbers are the hands pointing to? Let me know and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • big hand / hour hand
  • little hand / minute hand
  • clockwise, counterclockwise
  • round the clock

 

Vocabulary

with that bit of business taken care of = com isso resolvido, com essa parte esclarecida (não precisa ser a respeito de “negócios” necessariamente)

 

Como falo em inglês: Cantadas

How’s it going?

Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre cantadas em inglês que eu achei engraçadas… Não perca.

Observação: Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

[audio:http://media.blubrry.com/podcast_ingls_online/www.inglesonline.com.br/mp3/podcast-pickuplines.mp3]

Transcrição

How’s it going? You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy.

So how about today we have our podcast about a fun topic: funny pick-up lines! Yes, pick-up lines. Or, as we call them in Brazil, “cantadas”. And when I say funny, obviously some people will think they’re funny; others will think they’re cheesy or just plain distasteful. Who knows? Keep listening and tell me what you think. All we really know is that the person saying the pick-up line is openly showing their interest in you.

One more thing before we start: you can say pick-up lines or chat-up lines – same thing. Also, I’ve collected the examples I’m giving you in this episode from a few different sites so if you’d like to see more, just do an online search for “pick-up lines”. You’ll find a lot.

Alright, so how about this one: Your hand looks heavy. Let me hold it for you. A bit cheeky if it’s coming from a stranger, is what I think. So here’s a list of my “favourite” ones, so to speak:

Come live in my heart, and pay no rent.

We’re not socks, but I think we’d make a great pair.

I hope there’s a fire truck nearby, ’cause you’re smoking!

Well, here I am. What were your other two wishes?

If I were a cat, I would spend all 7 lives with you.

What do you think so far? Good? Seriously, if you’re a girl – what would your reaction be if someone you barely know said those to you? Has anyone ever approached you with a cheesy or funny pick-up line? In my case, I only remember that happening in one instance, seriously: I was walking my dog, and a guy said something along the lines of “If I say woof-woof will you take me home?” Everyone, I swear he said that, and I found it kind of funny. I still do.

From the list of pick-up lines I just read, I think my favourite one was “Well, here I am. What were your other two wishes”. I mean, I would just burst out laughing if someone said that to me – it’s too funny. So let me give you another short list of lines:

You’re so hot, I could bake cookies on you.

You look cold. Want to use me as a blanket?

Hey, my name is Microsoft. Can I crash at your place tonight? 

Do you know what’s on the menu? Me ‘n’ u.

OK, I don’t know about you, but if I heard any of those I’d laugh. I guess any guy saying these lines would be prepared for the girl to laugh. Now, I’ve only selected a few funny ones, but I would like to hear from guys and girls what your experience with this is in real life. Have you actually used a funny chat-up line on someone you barely knew? What was their reaction?

I guess it’s a lot more common for men to say that to girls, so what about you, ladies? What have guys said to you, and how did you react? Please let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!

 

Vocabulary

plain distasteful = simplesmente de mau gosto

cheeky = um pouco insolente mas pode ser bem-humorado ao mesmo tempo

smoking = atraente, linda

 

Podcast: Cover your tracks

Hello, everyone.

Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre um idiom muito comum com a palavra cover – não perca!

Observação: Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

[audio:http://media.blubrry.com/podcast_ingls_online/www.inglesonline.com.br/mp3/podcast-covertracks.mp3]

Transcrição

Hello, everyone. You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy!

So listen to this: when people do something wrong, sometimes they remember to cover their tracks. Many times they don’t! In those cases, it’s easy to figure out what that person did. For example: let’s say your work colleague Richard one day decides to steal from your company. Steal… office supplies. Yeah, pencils and notepads. He opens the supplies cupboard and takes, like, fifty pencils and about twenty notepads. However, Richard does all that while he’s eating cherry ice cream. Yes, cherry ice cream. That’s bright red.

So what happens? When Mary, the admin, opens the cupboard a few hours later she notices it’s been raided. As she wonders who stole all those office supplies, she sees some cherry ice cream on the floor. She immediately remembers that Richard loves cherry ice cream. In fact, he’s the only person in the entire office who likes that particular flavour of ice cream. She finds it very strange that Richard would have come to the office supplies cupboard to get stuff without speaking to her first. Why?

Well, because Mary is in charge of office supplies. So when someone in the office needs a new pen, or an eraser, or a notepad, they usually tell her what they need, and then Mary herself goes to the cupboard and brings the supply to that person. That way she always knows what’s in stock and what’s not. So right now she’s looking at the notepads and the pens, and she can see they’re running low. She’s suspicious. She looks at all that cherry ice cream on the floor – she’s actually a bit mad ’cause she stepped on it – and she knows it was Richard!

Richard stole office supplies but he didn’t cover his tracks, he just didn’t. Maybe he forgot. If Richard had remembered to cover his tracks, he could have looked around and searched for evidence that he’d been in the supplies cupboard. Maybe then he would have spotted the cherry ice cream on the floor, and cleaned it up. That way Mary wouldn’t be able to immediately figure out that it was him who stole all the supplies.

There’s more, though. As you may remember, Richard stole fifty pencils and about twenty notepads. That’s a lot of supplies, and he hid them all under his desk. Well, when Mary came back from the supplies closet she headed straight over to Richard’s desk. He wasn’t there, but Mary took a peek under his desk and she obviously saw the stolen pencils and notepads. I think it is clear that Richard definitely didn’t cover his tracks!

Not only did he leave cherry ice cream on the floor near the cupboard, but he also did a poor job of hiding what he stole. In order to cover your tracks, you would have to to hide or destroy anything that shows where you’ve been or what you’ve been doing – in other words, the incriminating evidence!

So, yeah, Richard did a poor job of covering his tracks, and he got caught. His manager called him into his office for a little chat… and Richard got suspended for a month and had to go through some HR training.

Can you think of a similar story where someone covered their tracks… or maybe they didn’t, and got caught? Let me know and talk to you next time!

 

Key expressions

  • cover my/your/his tracks

 

Vocabulary

cupboard = armário

admin = administrative assistant

raided = atacado de surpresa (aqui, num sentido mais figurado – não é um ataque de verdade)