Arquivo para categoria Podcast Inglesonline

Podcast com dicas de idioms e phrasal verbs de inglês intermediário em áudio.

Podcast: ‘First Dates’

Hello, you guys.  Hoje eu falo sobre um programa de TV que tem feito um certo sucesso aqui no Reino Unido: o reality ‘First Dates”.

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

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Transcrição

Hello, you guys. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast.

Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app.

Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven’t yet left a comment for this podcast, please do so. The more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes.

Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening.

So today I’m going to tell you about this reality show that I’ve been watching called “First Dates”. By the way, if you’re new to the Inglês Online podcast and you know nothing about me, here it goes: I moved to London three years ago so every once in a while I talk about life here or some cultural aspect…

And I’ve begun to introduce more and more idioms that are typically British to the podcast. Makes sense, right? Since now I hear them a lot and I’m actually learning them. Back when I used to live in Brazil, the English I consumed was literally a hundred percent American. I’ve talked a little bit before about differences between American and British English; I mentioned that understanding different accents was a bit of a struggle in the beginning…

For starters, I really had no idea there were so many different accents in the United Kingdom. In London alone, at least three or four. Fortunately overtime I’ve gotten better at comprehending what people say in different accents – watching lots of British shows has helped a lot, as well as just simply getting into a more relaxed frame of mind about this.

So anyway – back to ‘First Dates’. This is sort of a reality show on Channel Four here in the UK. I’ve included the link to their YouTube channel at the end of this post so maybe you can check out a few scenes if you like. So it’s a bit random for me to watch a dating show, so to speak. By the way – if you need a refresher on dating vocabulary, check out this episode of our podcast.

Anyway – I’m usually not very interested in dating shows, but my housemate had mentioned this show a couple of times saying that it was kind of sweet. Then a couple of weeks later a friend of mine said the same thing and I thought “Ok, that’s it. I have to watch it.”

The premise of the show is simple: if you’re a single person and are interested in dating… And you don’t mind being on a blind date that is being televised, then you get in touch with them and if you’re selected they’ll ask you about your preferences and hopefully match you up with someone. Then the both of you will meet up at a restaurant in central London and your whole encounter will be broadcast on TV! Standard.

So I went ahead and watched a whole season and I have to say, it really was entertaining and kinda nice to see two strangers hitting it off and having a good time. And it’s all ages, backgrounds, physical types, nationalities, everything.

Would you believe me if I told you that some people who first met on the show have decided to get married or live together? Well, it’s true. Now, would you be able to go on a blind date on TV? I wouldn’t. No way! What do you think of the premise of the show – and is there anything similar in Brazil at the moment? What’s it called?

Let me know in the comments and talk to you next time!

 

Vocabulário

in London alone = só em Londres

premise of the show = o conceito (premissa) do programa

standard = típico (nesse caso, usado para sarcasmo)

hit it off (with someone) = se dar super bem de primeira (geralmente duas pessoas que acabaram de se conhecer)

 

First Dates YouTube channel

 

Como falo em inglês: De uma certa maneira…

Hi, everybody.  Hoje eu falo sobre idioms super comuns do inglês com a palavra way.

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

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Transcrição

Hi, everybody. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast.

Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app.

Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven’t yet left a comment for this podcast, please do so. The more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes.

Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening.

So, you know when you ask for someone’s help and you can tell that person went beyond the basics and actually put in some effort in order to help you? We say that this person went out of his or her way to help you. Let’s say you talk to Shelly, who works in your office. You need her help to find a document, but deep down you don’t really believe she’ll be able to find it.

A couple of days later Shelly gets back to you and says she’s found it. She made a few phone calls, tracked down someone who had kept an old copy with them, and when she finally got her hands on it, she scanned it and emailed it to you. This is way beyond Shelly’s job description. She didn’t really need to go through all that trouble.

Shelly went out of her way to get that document for you. She went out of her way. You had initially asked her whether she had a copy and she said no… And you thought that was the end of it. But she spent time making phone calls and tracking people down in order to get it for you. I think most people who work for a company know someone like that. There’s always that person who will go out of their way to help others.

Imagine that you’re driving one day and, all of a sudden, your car just stops and simply won’t start again. You call your good friend Mark, who lives in that neighbourhood, and he comes to pick you up. He calls a tow truck for you. He then takes you home and you have dinner with his family. He offers to drive you back home after dinner. The next day he texts you, just to check on you and ask if you need anything. Mark is going out of his way to be helpful and to be there for you as a friend.

Now here’s another popular expression with way. It’s very simple, and very common. Let’s say you’re telling someone about how you and your brothers were raised by your aunt Maria after your parents passed away when you were kids. So you say “In a way, aunt Maria was a mother to us.” She is not literally your mother, but she filled the role of mother for many years. She did most of the things a mother would do, so, in a way, she’s like a mother to you and your brothers.

Your friend John is now telling you about this manager at the company he works for. The manager is a very authoritarian person who likes to boss people around and he’ll even throw a tantrum if someone challenges him. John says “In a way, he’s like a dictator who thinks our company is his country to run.”

Yesterday I was late to catch a train and ended up missing it. As I waited for the next train, I had time to make a phone call and catch the person just when they were about to leave. So, in a way, it was a good thing I missed the train.

Now, I’m sure you know someone who goes out of their way to help others. Who is it? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!

 

Key terms

  • in a way
  • go out of one’s way

 

Vocabulário

deep down = lá no fundo

track someone/something down = conseguir encontrar ou fazer contato com alguém/algo

a tow truck = um caminhão-guincho

be there for someone = dar apoio a alguém

boss someone around = mandar e desmandar em alguém

throw a tantrum = dar chilique

to challenge someone = desafiar alguém

Podcast: Straight from the horse’s mouth

Hello, all.  Hoje falamos sobre dois idioms muito comuns no inglês com a palavra horse.

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglesonline no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Transcrição

Hello, all. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast.

Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app.

Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven’t yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes.

Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening.

So here’s an idiom I’ve been hearing quite a bit lately: I don’t have a horse in this race. What does that mean? Basically it means that you’re talking about something whose outcome doesn’t affect you. People usually say that to mean, you know, that they can be impartial or unbiased regarding the topic they’re talking about, as in “I don’t have a horse in this race – whatever the outcome, it doesn’t matter to me but here’s my opinion…”

For example, let’s say your friend is telling you about a new Italian restaurant that opened in his neighbourhood, and how it is much better than the old Italian restaurant near his flat. Your friend says that the new place is part of a chain and, no matter what you order, they’ll get the food to your table in less than fifteen minutes. Your friend is raving about it and saying he will never go back to the old restaurant.

And then you say “Look, I don’t even like Italian food so I don’t have a horse in this race. I have to say, though, anything you order ready in under fifteen minutes… That doesn’t sound very appetising to me. If I were you I wouldn’t ditch the old place just yet.”

Or let’s say your friend is doing some course homework. You glance at one of the answers and you can tell he misused a word, which changes the meaning of the answer. You let him know but he insists you’re wrong. You say “Look, I don’t have a horse in this race; I’m just trying to help.” It doesn’t really affect you whether your friend misuses the word or not: you have no horse in this race.

So let’s move on to our second idiom of today: straight from the horse’s mouth. This is a very, very common one and if you regularly watch TV shows you’ve probably heard it before. Let’s say your friend Jennifer has just told you she’s moving to Poland. So later today you bump into your other friend Leslie, who’s also friends with Jennifer, and you give her the news: Jennifer is moving to Poland.

Leslie is very surprised, and says “Where did you hear that?” and you say “Straight from the horse’s mouth.” The horse in this case is Jennifer, figuratively speaking, of course. Jennifer gave you the news herself. You heard it straight from the horse’s mouth.

Your friend Kimmy missed class yesterday, so you phone her up to let her know you’re all taking a test tomorrow. Kimmy says “Who told you that?” and you say “I was in class! Heard it straight from the horse’s mouth.” The horse, in this case, would be the teacher.

That’s a very common situation, isn’t it? You’re telling someone a secret, a bit of gossip, news, and they say “Are you sure? Who told you that? Where did you hear that?” Well, now you know: every time you get your information from the source – the person who’s moving to another country, who’s been in an accident, or the decision-maker in the situation… You can say “I heard it straight from the horse’s mouth.”

Can you think of anything going on in your own life right now where you would say that? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!

 

Key terms

  • I don’t have a horse in this race
  • straight from the horse’s mouth

 

Vocabulário

ditch the old place = abandonar o lugar antigo

Como falo em inglês: Isso é novidade pra mim

Hi, everyone.  Hoje falamos sobre idioms e provérbios em inglês com a palavrinha news.

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglesonline no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Transcrição

Hi, everyone. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast.

Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app.

Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven’t yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes.

Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening.

Let’s get started today with the phrase That’s news to me. Yep: that is news to me. I love talking about the word news, because the way it agrees with the verb is counterintuitive to us Portuguese speakers, so the more we hear it used the correct way, the more familiar with it we’ll get. In other words, news ends with an S and we Brazilians have this almost uncontrollable impulse to say “the news are…“. Oh- that’s a mistake.

We say ‘the news is’, ‘the news was’, ‘What’s the news?’ and so on. News is singular. So our first term of today is “That’s news to me”. Very common to say that when someone tells you something and you’re at least mildly surprised. Or maybe the other person thought you already knew and they expected you to have done something about it.

For example, you’re at the office and your assistant says “The new sales manager just called and said you were supposed to meet with him a half hour ago.” You say “That’s news to me. Who scheduled this meeting? ” So the sales manager thinks the two of you were supposed to meet..? That’s news to you.

The office party has been canceled? That’s news to me. Matt has a broken arm? That’s news to me. Show da Xuxa is no longer on TV? That’s news to me.

And here’s a very common proverb with the word news – notice the verb: Bad news travels fast. Travels; bad news travels. Isn’t that true, though? I guess it’s the same everywhere. When something bad happens, it spreads like wildfire. Yeah, bad news usually spreads like wildfire anywhere.

So when you see someone who’s been fired, for example, and you say “Sorry to hear you’ve been fired” and they express surprise and say “Wow, you’ve heard!”, you can say “Yeah, bad news travels fast.” Or when someone comes to you with bad news that you’ve already heard, you can say “Yeah, I know. Bad news travels fast.”

What is your personal opinion about this one? Would you agree that bad news travels fast, especially when compared to good news?

So here’s a saying with good news to wrap up the episode. No news is good news. Again, pay attention to the verb: is. No news is good news. That means that if you haven’t had any news about something or someone, everything is fine. No news is good news. Obviously, this isn’t always true. I think you’ll agree with me.

However, I think most of the time it is true that no news is good news. If people you know go away on holiday and you don’t hear from them, that’s probably because they’re busy having a good time. If your brother moves to another city to go to college and you don’t hear from him for a while, he’s probably getting on with his new life.

So give me your example. Tell me your most recent story where someone told you something and your reaction was “That’s news to me”. Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!

 

Key terms

  • That’s news to me
  • Bad news travels fast
  • No news is good news

 

Vocabulário

spreads like wildfire = espalha que nem fogo em palha

Como falo em inglês: Estou com uma sensação estranha

Hi, everyone.  Hoje falamos sobre idioms super comuns no inglês com as palavras funnycomedy.

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglesonline no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Transcrição

Hi, everyone. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast.

Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app.

Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven’t yet left a comment for this podcast please do so: the more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes.

Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening.

So let’s say you’re on your way to see a play at the theatre with your friends Jay and Trey, and then Jay says “I’ve got a funny feeling about tonight.” Now, what does Jay mean by “a funny feeling”? Let’s hear it: Jay goes on to say that he thinks something’s gonna go wrong tonight. There may be an accident with one of the actors; you may never get to the theatre because you’ll get lost; maybe someone very tall will sit right in front of you and you won’t be able to see a thing; maybe the snack bar will be out of your favourite snack and it just will not be the same without it.

Whatever it is, Jay can’t say. He’s just got a funny feeling about tonight. So a funny feeling is kind of an intuition. It’s not a feeling about something being really funny in a comedic sense; it’s more of a premonition. You have known Jay for years and you know that he’s a little psychic, and… he’s usually spot on. It turns out Jay was right once again. The theatre had to be evacuated halfway through the play due to a bomb threat!

So that’s what it means when somebody says they’ve got a funny feeling about something. They don’t mean funny ha-ha, they mean a weird feeling. An intuition. A comedy is funny… Right? What kind of funny? Funny ha-ha (hopefully). A circus clown is usually funny ha-ha. When your friend Jay says he’s got a funny feeling, though, he doesn’t mean funny ha-ha, he means the other kind of funny: funny peculiar; a weird feeling.

Here’s something you will often hear from characters in movies or TV shows: “This feels funny.” When a character says that, they usually don’t mean that it feels funny, as in funny ha-ha. They mean that it feels funny as in, funny peculiar. In other words, whatever situation they’re in, it feels a bit weird.

And here’s another one before we wrap up: cut the comedy. You say this to someone when you want them to stop acting silly, horsing around and so on. Let’s say you’re having a meeting with your teammates. You’re thirty minutes into the meeting and everyone is still babbling about the weekend, laughing and teasing each other. You, on the other hand, have to be somewhere after the meeting so you finally say “Ok everyone, let’s cut the comedy and get to work, shall we?”

I wanna hear your example. Can you remember the last time you had a funny feeling about something? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!

Key terms

  • a funny feeling
  • funny ha-ha
  • cut the comedy

Vocabulário

you have known Jay for years = você conhece o Jay há anos

to be spot on = acertar na mosca

to horse around = ficar brincando, falando bobeira

you’re (x) minutes into the meeting = já faz (x) minutos que começou a sua reunião

Shall we? = Vamos? (pode ser usada também ao final de uma sugestão, instrução, etc)

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