Arquivo para categoria Podcast Inglesonline

Podcast com dicas de idioms e phrasal verbs de inglês intermediário em áudio.

Como digo em inglês: Ela aprende rápido

Hi, everyone.

Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre algumas comuns com a palavra QUICK. Não perca: ouça já!

Observação: Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

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[audio:http://media.blubrry.com/podcast_ingls_online/www.inglesonline.com.br/mp3/podcast-quickstudy.mp3]

Transcrição

Hi, everyone. You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy!

So let’s get started! You know how some people, sometimes, seem to be always ready to do something… like, complain, for example. Or criticise. It’s like that is the first thing on their mind. Whatever it is, whatever the situation, the first words out of their mouth always seem to be in the form of criticism. Or a complaint.

So there’s a very common way to describe that behaviour in English, and it’s very simple too: you say someone is quick to criticise. Or quick to complain. For example, Janet is always quick to point out the flaws in restaurant service. Whenever you guys go together to a new place to eat, Janet will start with her observations: the waiter isn’t dressed properly. Those tables are not being serviced. She forgot to bring the juice. Granted, Janet is a food critic, but still. She’s very quick to criticise and point out flaws in general.

Here’s another way to use the word quick: when someone’s a quick study. That’s an easy one to understand as well, so let’s hear it a few times so you get used to it and start saying it yourself. Basically, someone who’s able to learn something easily or quickly is a quick study. And that doesn’t apply just to school stuff like geography and math. You say someone is a quick study when they’re able to understand how something works fairly quickly. When you’re teaching someone a trick, for example, and they get it relatively quickly? You can tell them they’re a quick study. Or if someone says “Hey, I’d like to teach you how to do this, but it’s not that easy and we don’t have a lot of time”, you can tell them, “Go on, I’m a quick study.”

And here’s an interesting… phrasal verb, I suppose, that is somewhat related to what we’re talking about: study up on something. Study up. That means you’re going to learn as much as you can about a certain topic. You’re going to ask people for tips, then head over to the local library, loan a couple of books on the topic, do several online searches and get a hold of everything and anything that will help you learn new things about your chosen topics. You really want to exhaust your options. That’s how you study up on something.

A while ago – a few years ago, actually – when I decided to find out what was necessary to acquire fluency on a second language, that’s what I did. I read up on language acquisition. See? I’m using READ instead of STUDY here. I read up on language acquisition. So I did a lot of online searching and read up on language acquisition. Of course, I concentrated on what made sense to me and on stuff that was backed up by positive evidence, but I did read up on the topic.

Can you give me an example that relates to your life? Let me know, and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • someone is quick to (do something)
  • quick study
  • study up on / read up on

 

Vocabulary

granted = tudo bem que

exhaust your options = conhecer/ usar todas as opções possíveis

Como falo em inglês: Uma coisa não tem a ver com a outra

Hi, everyone.

Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre dois idioms super comuns entre os falantes da língua inglesa. Ouça já!

Observação: Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

[audio:http://media.blubrry.com/podcast_ingls_online/www.inglesonline.com.br/mp3/podcast-applesoranges.mp3]

Transcrição

Hi, everyone. You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy!

So picture this: someone’s trying to convince you of something, or they’re trying to make you understand the way they think. So they proceed to make a comparison – this way, it will be easier for you to grasp the message behind what they’re saying. For example: your friend John is telling you that, in his opinion, parks in the city should offer free food to visitors. He says “They offer bathrooms, don’t they? We can use the toilets for free. So I think they should give us food for free as well.”

You reply “John, you’re comparing apples and oranges here.” You’re comparing apples and oranges, or you’re mixing apples and oranges. Free toilet services and free food? That’s apples and oranges. These are two different things that shouldn’t necessarily be handled in the same way. So you tell John “The city is able to provide toilet services, which are relatively simple and affordable enough. But providing food is a much more complex operation – the cost is a lot higher, it involves several specific rules and regulations that have to be adhered to, not to mention that, you know, different people want and like different things! Why would you want to deprive people of all the different choices that they can have when buying food from a shop?” And you finish your argument by repeating  “John, you’re comparing apples and oranges.”

Or your other friend, Molly, tells you that she’s going to do a Math test tomorrow. The subject of the test is… two things: one, addition. Like, two plus two equals four. Two, subtraction. As in, eight minus three equals five. That’s it. Molly is a professional accountant, by the way. I think she knows how to add and subtract. You, on the other hand, are a medical student  and tomorrow you have your final… neurosciences exam. Ok, I don’t even know if neurosciences is an exam subject in medical school, but let’s go with it. So you basically have to study a whole lot in the field of neurosciences, for tomorrow.

Molly knows all that, obviously, but she still says “Wow, we both have to study hard today. I’m sure we’ll have to put in the same amount of effort, me with addition and subtraction, and you with neurosciences!” And you know she means it – she is not being sarcastic or anything. So, obviously, your first thought is “Yeah, that’s apples and oranges, Molly. Apples and oranges.”

Alright! Let’s move on to another idiom: your days are numbered, or this or that thing’s days are numbered. If you’re in the habit of watching American films I’m sure you’ve heard this one before. That would be something that the hero of the movie would typically say to the villain: Your days are numbered. That means, you won’t be able to keep doing what you’re doing for too long. I’ll catch you, I will stop you, you’ll go to jail – your days are numbered.

So basically that’s it – if something’s days are numbered, that thing will not exist for much longer. I think everyone can think of an example in their life. Sometimes… sometimes there’s a shop in your neighbourhood that just can’t seem to do well, no matter how much effort the owners put into it. Whenever you walk past, you can’t help but notice that it’s empty. No customers. That makes you think that this shop’s days are numbered, right?

Have you had an example like that in your neighbourhood? Please let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • compare / mix apples and oranges
  • days are numbered

 

Vocabulary

you can’t help but notice = não dá pra (você) deixar de perceber

Como falo em inglês: Deu um chilique

Hello!

Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre algumas maneiras de dizer que alguém ‘teve um chilique’!

Observação: Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

[audio:http://media.blubrry.com/podcast_ingls_online/www.inglesonline.com.br/mp3/podcast-throwfit.mp3]

Transcrição

Hello! You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy!

So I’ve talked in the past about people having a strop and not being able to hold their temper. Today we come back to the same theme with the following idiomthrow a temper tantrum. It is such a common expression that people will often just say “throw a tantrum”. A tantrum is basically a display of bad temper  – someone throwing a tantrum will seem to be very angry or seriously unhappy about something, and they may refuse to behave in the way that is expected of them, or refuse to cooperate with something and so on.

So, you guys, there are some words that are commonly associated with this topic of throwing a temper tantrum – first of all, you could also say throw a fit. A fit. In this case, we wouldn’t say “throw a temper fit”, ok? Just go with throw a fit, or throw a tantrum, and the message will be very clear. Here’s a way to describe a temper tantrum… Jack threw a tantrum this morning because he wasn’t happy with the breakfast served at the hotel he’s staying in. He said he was frustrated with the service, since he had specifically asked the hotel staff for scrambled eggs the night before, and they made fried eggs instead for his breakfast this morning.

Jack had a fit. He threw a tantrum and, while you understand that not getting your eggs the way you want can be very distressing (*), you also think that Jack’s behaviour was very childish and immature. So when someone’s childish, they’re behaving in a way that a young child would behave – because that child hasn’t learned yet that they can’t have everything they want all the time and they will cry or throw their toys out of the pram when things don’t go their way.

You can also describe the behaviour of someone having a tantrum as extreme. It’s not an everyday kind of behaviour, is it? We don’t want to go around having a fit whenever we don’t get what we want. Between having no reaction at all, and throwing a temper tantrum, most people are able to go somewhere in the middle and explain why they’re not happy and maybe achieve some kind of resolution. So throwing a tantrum might be described as childish and extreme.

Now the other extreme of that is people who remain cool, calm and collected when in a stressful situation. Or even if they feel frustrated, tired or even angry, they’re able to keep their cool. Many people say that practicing meditation helps them remain cool and collected. Others say that praying helps them in remaining centred. When someone is able to remain centred, that means that they don’t let negative emotions get to them under stress. They’re able to navigate through a difficult situation, be rational and still make sensible decisions.

Now, tell me: have you ever witnessed someone throw a tantrum in public? What did you see? Let me know in the comments and talk to you next time.

 

Key expressions

  • throw a (temper) tantrum
  • throw a fit
  • cool, calm and collected
  • remain centred (UK) or centered (US)

 

 

(*)That was a bit of sarcasm :-)

Como falo em inglês: No dia de São Nunca

How have you been?

Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre idioms com a palavra HELL. Não perca!

Observação: Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

[audio:http://media.blubrry.com/podcast_ingls_online/www.inglesonline.com.br/mp3/podcast-givehell.mp3]

Transcrição

How have you been? You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy!

So here we go: this week I’m going to talk about two idioms with the word hell. Yep, hell, the opposite, so to speak, of heaven. Let’s get right into it: if someone gives you hell for something you’ve done or said, that means… they’re not happy, to say the least. Giving you hell means telling you off, scolding you in a severe way. As per usual, however, sometimes people say “Oh, so and so will give me hell if I’m late” and they might be exaggerating a little bit. Maybe their friend will say something if they’re late but not necessarily give them hell – but we sometimes do that, right? We use certain expressions to exaggerate something and to create a certain effect.

So you might say “I didn’t do the dishes yesterday and my mother gave me hell for it”, meaning, she was upset. Or you could hear your work colleague say “My team screwed up the sales presentation to our biggest client and our director gave us hell for it” meaning, the director gave the team a severe scolding that will be hard to forget.

So here’s another one with hell: when hell freezes over. As everyone knows, hell is a place that is supposed to be really, really hot. So you can imagine what a person means when they say “when hell freezes over”. That means never, ever; not a chance. “Are you going to sell your bike and buy a car and start driving everywhere?” “Ha, when hell freezes over! I love riding my bike. Even when I’m on vacation! I’ll go everywhere on bike.”

So let me put together a little story for you: your boss, Joe, is the marketing manager and you’ve told him that your colleague Tina, over at Sales, said she needed a detailed report of all marketing expenses for the last five years – every single one of them. And, she needs it in two days. So when you’re done talking, Joe just looks at you and says “Yes. We’re going to prepare a complete report on every one of our expenses in the last five years for the day after tomorrow, when hell freezes over.” That’s it. You know that when your boss Joe says no, he means no. Tina is going to get that report when hell freezes over.

Well, next thing you do is march over to Sales and give Tina the news. You’re going to start working on the report as soon as hell freezes over. You obviously use different words to convey the message, right? You say “Tina, unfortunately this isn’t something we can do at the moment. We don’t have enough staff to be able to handle that kind of task.” Tina’s boss, Larry, who’s just walking by, overhears you. He’s very angry to learn he’s not going to see this report anytime soon. In fact, he’s giving you hell for it right about now. He’s turned red and looks very agitated. Really upsetting what’s going on; Larry is clearly not happy. You go back to your boss’ office and tell him that Larry has given you hell for telling him about the report.

So that kind of thing happens sometimes, doesn’t it? What is your example? Let me know and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • give someone hell
  • when hell freezes over

 

Vocabulary

overhears you = ouve (a sua conversa, sem estar participando dela)

Como falo em inglês: É OK, mas nada demais

How’s it going?

Hoje, no podcast, eu falo sobre idioms com a palavra NOTHING! Não perca.

Observação: Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

[audio:http://media.blubrry.com/podcast_ingls_online/www.inglesonline.com.br/mp3/podcast-nothingwrite.mp3]

Transcrição

inglês: nothingHow’s it going? You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy!

So in today’s episode we’ll focus on the word ‘nothing’ for a little bit. First of all, listen to it again: nothing. Did you notice I did not say “NÓ-thing”? I said it more like “nothing”. Just something to notice – we speak Portuguese as our native language and because of the sounds of Portuguese, we would tend to read a word such as nothing this way: NÓ-thing. So pay attention from now on every time you come across this word, hopefully because you’ve heard it: nothing.

And here’s something people say a lot – it’s our first expression of today: it’s nothing personal. When someone says that to you, they’re trying to tell you that whatever behaviour they’ve had or decision they’ve made was not meant to criticise or offend you. It doesn’t mean you’re not a good person or whatever quality may be related to that decision. It doesn’t even mean that they don’t like you. They may have made their decision purely based on objective factors.

For example, let’s take a job interview. You had a great time with the interviewer, you guys hit it off and chatted for twenty minutes, uninterruptedly. You thought “It’s in the bag”. But then you get a call from that same person two days later, saying that they had a look at your resumé and realised that they need a couple of skills for the position… and, unfortunately, at this time these are skills that you don’t possess. “It’s nothing personal”, the interviewer says. “I liked you as a candidate but we really need those skills”.

Obviously sometimes people will say that in an insincere or sarcastic way. Of course! If you watch lots of American films or TV shows you’ve probably come across it before. Example: someone says “Hey, we don’t need your services anymore. Nothing personal!” when it’s obvious they have made that decision because maybe you brought carrot cake to work the day before and didn’t ask your coworkers if they wanted a bite. You get the picture. By the way, that reminds me of a somewhat similar expression, no offense, which has been featured in a previous episode – have a listen.

And here’s another one that I’ve heard a lot in the past few years: it’s nothing to write home about. When you say something is nothing to write home about, what you’re saying is… this thing I’m talking about? It’s nothing special. It’s really unremarkable, or not that great. If I were to sit down and write a letter to my folks back home, I would certainly not include that bit of news in my letter – because it’s nothing to write home about, really.

Can you think about something in your life right now that would make you say – it’s nothing to write home about? Maybe it’s your cell phone. It may be your bicycle, or the food place you go to for lunch, or the performance of your coworker. Let me know what you come up with, and talk to you next time!

 

Key expressions

  • nothing personal
  • nothing to write home about

 

Vocabulary

You guys hit it off = vocês se deram muito bem

It’s in the bag = está no papo

You get the picture = (acho que) você entende

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