Arquivo para categoria Podcast Inglesonline

Podcast com dicas de idioms e phrasal verbs de inglês intermediário em áudio.

Como falo em inglês: a intenção dele foi boa

 What’s up, everyone?

Hoje eu falo sobre as intenções de alguém em inglês. Como dizer a intenção dele foi boa, ou de boas intenções o inferno está cheio? Confira também duas expressões para dizer “falar bem de alguém” neste episódio.

Observação: Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

[audio:http://media.blubrry.com/podcast_ingls_online/www.inglesonline.com.br/mp3/podcast-intentions.mp3]

Transcrição

What’s up, everyone? You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy!

So you know when someone behaves in a way that ends up doing more harm than good, but you just know they had the best intentions when doing so? They were just trying to help; they really meant well. You know this person is well-meaning. When someone is well-meaning, that means they… mean well.

However, you were there when they did what they did or said what they said and you know that the end result wasn’t that great. Rather than being mad at them, though, you’re just lamenting the sad outcome. You know that their heart was in the right place.

So that’s our first idiom of today: their heart was in the right place when they did that or said whatever. It may not have helped, it may even have made matters a bit worse, but… in the end, their heart is in the right place. You may just need to have a quick word with them to maybe make them aware of the effect of their actions.

For example: Steve offered to put in a good word for you with his boss, knowing that you’re coveting a new position in his department. He goes ahead and does just that: he tells his boss you’re great to work with, and very competent too. However, he goes and says that you’ve been doing an awesome job in project XYZ, which is a top secret project that you’re not supposed to be talking about to other people.

So now Steve has basically made clear to his boss that you can’t keep your mouth shut. Great. That kinda ruins the whole point of talking you up to the boss. You were sure Steve knew that project XYZ was confidential. Maybe he didn’t. Anyway, you have known Steve for years now and you know he’s a good guy. You know he would never do anything to harm your chances at getting that job. You just know that his heart is in the right place. He screwed up a little, but his heart is in the right place.

…Which leads me to the second one of today’s episode – I guess we can call this one a proverb: the road to hell is paved with good intentions. Obviously, people often mean well but end up doing bad things or even wreaking havoc sometimes. We say something very similar in Brazil, don’t we? However I could never work out whether that saying applies to someone who really meant well; someone whose heart is in the right place but ends up making things worse.

Now that I’m thinking about it, I think that’s exactly the case and that is how this saying came about: good intentions that end up causing trouble. The road to hell is paved with good intentions. And, as we do in Brazil, you can say that proverb in order to imply that someone knew full well what they were doing when they were “trying to help”, so to speak. Basically you’re accusing them of not being honest: “So Jane, now I know why you offered to bring me lunch. You were trying to give me food poisoning! This sandwich is the worst thing I’ve ever had.” And you finish your rant by telling your colleagues “The road to hell is paved with good intentions. Beware of Jane and her lunch runs.”

So I guess we can all think of great examples of people who meant well but ended up making things worse. Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • someone’s heart is in the right place
  • the road to hell is paved with good intentions

 

Vocabulary

put in a good word for you with = falar bem de você para

coveting = querendo, desejando

talk someone up = falar bem de alguém

mean well = ter/tem boas intenções

wreak havoc = arruinar, causar muito problema

work out = figure out

lunch run = a ida até algum lugar de comida pra comprar o almoço pro grupo/pessoal do escritório

beware of = cuidado com

 

Como falo em inglês: Carteiro tentou entregar e eu não estava em casa

What’s up, everyone?

Hoje eu falo sobre uma tentativa dos correios daqui de me entregar uma compra que fiz online outro dia. Eu não estava em casa, e então eu comento quais são as opções para pegar o pacote. Veja e ouça o vocabulário e collocations específicos para essa situação: Royal Mail, delivery attempt, “Something for you” card, arrange redelivery.

Obs.: para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece no menu de social media aqui ao lado ou acima do post.

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3

[audio:http://media.blubrry.com/podcast_ingls_online/www.inglesonline.com.br/mp3/podcast-royalmail.mp3]

Transcrição

What’s up, everyone? You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy!

So as I’m here with my laptop open on… my lap, thinking about what my next podcast is going to be about, I decide to check the Royal Mail website and see where my new boots are. Let me explain: the Royal Mail in the United Kingdom is equivalent to our Correios, or the Post Office in the US. A few days ago I ordered a pair of boots off the Internet, and a postal worker should be delivering them any day now to my place.

So I’ve literally just gone to the Royal Mail website right now and typed in the tracking number the shoe shop provided me… and there it is: a Royal Mail worker tried to find me fifty minutes ago at my place, and I wasn’t there. I’m here, at a coffee shop. It’s ten past one in the afternoon now, and for the last several weeks I have always been home at this time.. but today I decided to leave earlier than usual and grab a cup of coffee while writing the podcast. Obviously, that was enough to set Murphy’s Law into motion and bam! That’s when the delivery person showed up. Bummer.

So this is what happens now: the delivery person has hopefully left me a “Something For You” card – that’s a small card that lets me know a delivery was recently attempted. After twenty four hours – which in this case is tomorrow around 1PM – I could go to the nearest post office carrying the card and some ID, and pick up my boots.

There’s another option, though: instead of going myself to the post office, I can arrange a redelivery by either calling up Royal Mail or clicking on a button on their website. You can see what I’m talking about if you look at the screenshot I’ve included in this post.

royal mail ingles

Rearranging delivery is a nifty little feature of Royal Mail that I have used before – this isn’t the first time I’ve missed a delivery – and I’m probably going to use it again now. So I’m going to click that button and enter some details from the “Something For You” card, and then choose a date for redelivery. Only, this time I’ll make sure I’m home ’cause I don’t want to miss it again!

So what happens in Brazil right now if you miss a delivery? I remember the postal worker used to make three attempts at delivery before returning the package to their warehouses. Do they still do that? And what happens if you miss delivery all those times? Should you go to a Correios office with the Brazilian version of the “Something For You” card and your RG to pick up your package? I don’t think I ever had to do that when I lived in Brazil – let me know if you’ve done it… and talk to you next time.

Key expressions

  • Royal Mail
  • delivery attempt
  • “Something For You” card
  • arrange redelivery

 

Vocabulary

on my lap = no meu colo

bummer = gíria (mais comum nos EUA) de insatisfação, como “que chatice”

nifty = particularly nice, good

 

P.S. A expressão no título deste post pode ser dita simplesmente assim – “I missed a delivery [because I wasn’t home obviously]”

 

 

Como falo em inglês: Pegou pesado demais com o coitado

How’s it going?

Hoje eu falo sobre dois idioms comuníssimos no inglês quando queremos dizer que uma pessoa pegou pesado demais com alguém que já estava mal.

Observação:

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

[audio:http://media.blubrry.com/podcast_ingls_online/www.inglesonline.com.br/mp3/podcast-cheapshot.mp3]

Transcrição

How’s it going? You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy!

Today I’m going to talk about a type of situation that is particularly unpleasant… It’s not nice to take part in it and it’s not nice to watch it unfold either. Interestingly, there are several English idioms that can be applied in this context, so let’s start with kick someone when they’re down.

Just imagine your work colleague John made a big mistake yesterday and, because of his mistake, the company has now lost a significant amount of money. John got reprimanded by his manager and his job is hanging by a thread. Your desk is right next to John’s desk, so you’re there to watch as Margot, a marketing assistant, walks up to John and gives him a scolding for losing the business deal.

So, at this point, John feels awful for losing the deal, obviously, and he’s already been told off by this boss. You could say he’s in a pretty low place right now. So on top of that, Margot comes up to him and tells him off again. She’s basically kicking John when he’s already down. You feel compelled to pull Margot aside and have a word with her. You say “Margot, c’mon… John’s obviously aware he screwed up. There’s no need to kick him when he’s down.”

There’s no need to kick someone when they’re down. They’re already down, they’re aware of how they acted, they know they have screwed up. It’s a nice piece of advice: don’t kick someone when they’re down. So that leads me to the second idiom of today and it’s closely related to “kick someone when they’re down”. Why?

Well, when Margot scolded John she specifically mentioned that John should not have tried to conduct the negotiation in Spanish, as his Spanish is not that great… She’s basically saying it was a stupid decision. When you heard Margot say that, you thought “This is a bit much – it’s a bit much to comment on the details of how John screwed this up.”

So in addition to telling Margot she shouldn’t kick John when he’s down, you say “C’mon Margot, leave John alone. Now is not the time to point out that his poor Spanish skills were the reason he failed. That’s kind of a cheap shot. He feels bad enough already… Let’s just leave it.” A cheap shot is, let’s say, an attack directed at someone who can’t defend themselves. It could be a mean remark – it could even be a mean comment disguised as concern.

Imagine that someone’s feeling particularly vulnerable after making a mistake or being told off, just like John is. Someone then goes over and makes them feel worse by bringing up something negative about that person’s life that catches them off guard. This person feels weak right now,  so they can’t even properly defend themselves. You know what I mean? So that would have been a cheap shot. If you regularly watch American TV shows and movies, you will have certainly come across someone saying “That was a cheap shot. That was uncalled for.”

So I’d like to hear from you: can you remember the last time you witnessed a case of “kicking someone when they’re down”? Please let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • kick someone when they’re down
  • cheap shot

 

Vocabulary

is hanging by a thread = está por um fio

gives him a scolding = dá uma dura nele

he’s been told off = já levou uma dura (to tell someone off = dar uma dura em alguém)

a pretty low place = bem por baixo (pretty aqui é intensificador)

let’s just leave it = vamos parar de falar / dar atenção a isso

uncalled for = desnecessário (não precisava ter ido tão longe com a crítica / ataque)

 

Veja mais:

Como digo em inglês: Pega leve com ele

Podcast: idioms com TOGETHER

Hello, everyone.

Hoje eu falo sobre idioms super comuns com a palavra togetherEnjoy!

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

[audio:http://media.blubrry.com/podcast_ingls_online/www.inglesonline.com.br/mp3/podcast-together.mp3]

Transcrição

Hello, everyone. You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today I’m going to talk about a few idioms with the word together. They’re very common and you’ll hear them all the time in daily conversation, so listen on.

Here’s one of them: put our heads together, or put their heads together, or your heads. Let’s say you were asked by your boss to find some kind of solution to a problem, and, after thinking about it for a while you realise that Joe, the head of the sales team, has some information that would likely be useful in solving this problem.

So you go ahead and give Joe a ring, and you say “Hi Joe, my boss has asked me to find a solution to problem XYZ. I know you’ve been affected by it as well and you’ve got some experience on the topic, so I thought we’d get to the solution much faster if we put our heads together and try and figure this thing out.”

“Let’s put our heads together” means let’s get together and talk about this thing. Let’s discuss it, let’s hear each other’s ideas and brainstorm together. This way, we will figure things out much faster. You’ll hear this idiom a lot in offices where people are used to getting together and discussing problems, or in companies where teamwork is encouraged. Let’s put our heads together and find a solution to this problem. Or, Karen and Steve weren’t able to find a solution individually, but I’m sure if they put their heads together they’ll get there.

Here’s a related proverb: two heads are better then one. Same idea underlying “let’s put our heads together” – one head may not be able to come up with a plan to fix this issue, but with two heads we’ve got a better chance. Do we have our own idioms to say this kind of thing in Brazil? If you know, please leave a comment – I want to know.

And here’s the other “together” idiom of today: get your act together. If someone at work, for example, tells you to get your act together, they’re, well… saying you should probably change your behaviour a little bit. You should become more organised and generally function a bit better. They probably think that your desk is a bit of a mess, or maybe you’ve been turning in your reports a bit late, or the last couple of times you participated in company meetings you were slightly unprepared and your performance left much to be desired.

So that person – let’s say it’s your boss – tells you “You need to get your act together and start making your desk presentable. I also expect you to turn in your reports on time, and come to meetings better prepared. Get organised and be efficient about your work. Get your act together!”

This idiom can be used in personal situations as well – let’s say Tim’s girlfriend broke up with him six months ago and Tim is still so depressed about it that he hasn’t cleaned his place in months! There’s dust and dirt everywhere and also, a strange smell coming from the kitchen. You are a good friend of Tim’s and therefore it’s your job to finally tell him “Tim, enough is enough, my friend. I know you’re in pain but you have to get on with your life. Look around you! There’s filth everywhere. You have got to get your act together starting now, clean up this mess and move on.”

What are your examples? Let me know in the comments and talk to you next time!

 

Key idioms

  • put (people’s) heads together
  • get (someone’s) act together

 

Vocabulary

enough is enough = já chega, já deu

filth = sujeira, imundície

 

Como falo em inglês: Ele se comportou como criança mimada

Hi, all.

Hoje eu falo sobre idioms muito comuns aqui no Reino Unido, e que ouvi recentemente por causa do que aconteceu numa saída em grupo. Não perca!

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

[audio:http://media.blubrry.com/podcast_ingls_online/www.inglesonline.com.br/mp3/podcast-strop.mp3]

Transcrição

Hi, all. You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today I’m telling you what happened at a recent group outing.

Thank you for listening and for telling everyone you know,  and enjoy the podcast!

So you know when you get together with a friend and you catch each other up on what you’ve been up to… That’s what my friend Yasmin and I did about a week ago. So Yasmin was telling me that back in November her friend Sofia organised an outing on a Friday night. And here’s the first piece of vocabulary I’d like to highlight for our episode today: organise an event, organise an outing and so on. That’s what a British person will say when he or she is the one planning the event.

I’ll give you an example: a few weeks ago I organised dinner for a few friends of mine. I texted everyone with potential dates, heard back from them and settled on the final date. Then I called the pizza place, made a reservation and texted everyone back with the details. So I organised dinner for us, and later that evening my friends said “Thank you for organising”. This is more of a British way of saying it – I guess in the US you’d say something like “plan dinner” rather than organise.

So anyway, Yasmin’s friend Sofia organised an outing for herself, her boyfriend John, Sofia and two other people. So that was a total of 5 people. They went to a new pub in the neighbourhood, and once there they found a table and grabbed some drinks. Sofia, however, was disappointed that there was no dance floor. She really wanted to dance that night, and she was expecting to find a good dance floor and some nice music.

My friend Yasmin told me that the rest of the group was actually pleased with the pub, Yasmin included. Sofia wouldn’t let it go, though. She insisted on moving the party to a different pub with a dance floor, but by then it was already 10pm and no one really felt like leaving. Well, Sofia decided to go anyway – so she left and John, her boyfriend, went with her.

About a half hour later Sofia texted Yasmin, asking her to go to the other pub. Yasmin texted back saying she didn’t really feel like going as she was having a good time with the two other girls. Sofia insisted, saying that John was – listen to this – in a strop, and if Yasmin came over his mood might improve. To be in a strop means to be moody, to be in a bad mood. It’s British slang – never heard that in the US.

So basically Sofia wanted Yasmin to get to the second pub ’cause she thought John’s mood would improve – that’s because Yasmin and John have been friends for years. John was in a strop… And here’s another idiom my friend used to describe the situation – she said “Sofia told me John was throwing his toys out of the pram”. What does “pram” mean? A pram is a stroller – a four-wheeled sort of chair where you put a baby – and then you push it, of course! So the baby will often have toys in the pram, right? And when the baby has a strop and wants to throw a little tantrum, he or she will start throwing their toys out of the pram.

So when Yasmin told me that John was throwing his toys out of the pram, what she meant was, John was being immature and behaving like a child – maybe throwing a little temper tantrum. I think we all can think of examples when someone we know behaved like an immature child and threw their toys out of the pram.

Please let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • organise (an event, an outing)
  • be in a strop
  • throw toys out of the pram

 

Vocabulary

a group outing = uma saída em grupo

catch someone up (on something) = atualizar alguém (sobre algo); contar as novidades a alguém (sobre algo)

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