Arquivo para categoria Podcast Inglesonline

Podcast com dicas de idioms e phrasal verbs de inglês intermediário em áudio.

Como falo em inglês: Uma estimativa bem por cima

Hi, all.

Hoje eu falo sobre estimativas (dois idioms super comuns! Não perca!)

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[audio:http://media.blubrry.com/podcast_ingls_online/www.inglesonline.com.br/mp3/podcast-estimate.mp3]

Transcrição

Hi, all. You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and enjoy!

So let’s talk a little bit about the word estimate. That’s e-s-t-i-m-a-t-e. Take notice of the pronunciation: estimate. An estimate is an approximate calculation; you could say it’s an educated guess most of the time. Most of the time, not all of the time… sometimes people make an estimate and it’s just a wild guess.

Everyone has had to make estimates in their lives. When you’re about to go on a journey to your weekend destination, you make an estimate of how long the journey is going to take based on the weather, traffic reports, the distance to be traveled and so on.

Here are two very common ways in which the word estimate is used: the first one is combined with the word rough. If someone tells you they have a rough estimate of something, they are forewarning you that this estimate is really just an approximation and a better estimate could be made using additional information.

Usually you make a rough estimate when someone wants an answer or a number in that moment, and you don’t have all the information needed for that calculation on hand. So you just use whatever you know and… or remember in that moment, and tell them “Well, my rough estimate is XYZ. That’s a rough number, a rough estimate. Later today when I’m around my computer I’ll be able to make a better guess.”

Here’s another one: a ballpark estimate. A ballpark is a stadium where games are played that involve a ball. Ballpark estimate is a slang expression; it’s another way of saying, you know, “it’s an approximate number” or even “it’s a rough estimate.”    

Here’s an example: you take your car to the mechanic because it’s been making a strange noise. The mechanic tells you he’s going to look into it this afternoon. You ask him “How much is this going to be?” and he says “There’s no way I can tell you right now” and you insist: “Please give me a ballpark estimate”, and he says “In the 400, 500 range.”

That’s a ballpark estimate. Another example: your best friend says she’s throwing a party in the next few months and it is obviously very important that you be there, because it will be a party in your honour. But… you’re planning your annual vacation, and you’re about to start booking hotels for next month – so you absolutely need to have at least a ballpark estimate of the date to make sure that you’re not going to be away on that date.

You ask your friend and she says she doesn’t know yet. That’s her answer, “I don’t know.” So you go ahead and explain to her that you’re looking into hotels for the next few weeks, and say “If you can’t give me an exact date, give me a ballpark estimate.” Give me a date that is in the ballpark. Give me something, so I at least have some idea!

Now, listen to the verb we can use when we make an estimate – the verb is estimate. You make an estimate, and you estimate something. Can you estimate how many people work on the same floor with you? Can you estimate how many times you have brushed your teeth since the day you were born? Can you estimate how many hairs you have on your head? Just a ballpark estimate, c’mon :-)

Let me know in the comments what you’ve come up with, and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • a rough estimate
  • a ballpark estimate
  • estimate (verb)

 

Vocabulary

educated guess = um palpite feito com base em algum conhecimento e dados (e que provavelmente está correto)

 

Mais:

As duas pronúncias de estimate

Podcast: Nomes de lugares com pronúncia inesperada

… a não ser que você já os conheça, claro. What’s up?

Hoje eu falo sobre vários nomes de lugares aqui no Reino Unido, em especial na Inglaterra, cuja pronúncia eu só aprendi depois de ouvir a versão certa algumas vezes – estes nomes são muito counter-intuitive pra gente!

Observação: Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

[audio:http://media.blubrry.com/podcast_ingls_online/www.inglesonline.com.br/mp3/podcast-placenames.mp3]

Transcrição

What’s up? You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy!

So today I thought I’d give you a taste of some of the names I’ve encountered since I moved to London. Not people names, but places. Until I got to hear other people say them, I mispronounced quite a few of them. Some places in the UK have names that are not that intuitive to pronounce – well, not for us Brazilians, anyway. The US has got them as well, but I find that they’re a lot more common out here.

For this podcast in particular it would really be helpful if you followed the transcript as I say the name of each place. So let’s start with some neighbourhoods in London. Take Balham and Clapham, for example; two areas below the river. I think what I find a bit unusual is the H after the letters L and P and how the H is completely silent. It’s like it’s not even there. Balham and Clapham.

Now I was very surprised first time I heard someone say Southwark, Southwark which is the name of a huge area of London. I did not expect it and I hope you’re reading these words as well so you can be surprised as well! Southwark. What about the W in there? It just… disappeared.

How about this town in West London called Ruislip? That’s right, Ruislip. I can tell you that that is not the first pronunciation that came to mind when I first saw that word. And here’s one I learned very early on, because it’s a famous market in London and it’s in people’s mouths a lot: Borough market. Not “borou”, no, but Borough. Borough market.

So when I learned that one and then I saw “borough” affixed to the names of other places, I thought “Oh, OK, I know how to say that!” Only, I was wrong. Check these ones out: Loughborough and Peterborough. There are many more like these but I’m just giving you a couple of examples. Loughborough Junction is a neighbourhood in south London and Peterborough is a town in eastern England.

Now, this one – people who move to London get up to speed on this one pretty quickly, because it’s the name of an extremely well known touristic spot in central London, Leicester Square. I’ve heard it mispronounced in all kinds of ways: leicéster, laicester. Hey, I even did it myself years ago. Nope, it’s Leicester. Leicester is a city in the English Midlands, which is the central part of England. It’s a major city in the county of Leicestershire. Yep, Leicestershire. And Worcestershire.. I had to throw that one in.

Now, here’s the name of a place many Brazilians are reasonably familiar with: Windsor, where the Windsor castle is. Not “windssor”, but Windsor. We have a similar “z” sound in Swansea, a coastal town in Wales.

Now look what happens to “mouth” when it’s attached to the end of a name: Portsmouth. We also have Plymouth. Both are port cities in the south of England, which means they’re by the sea. I’ll finish today’s episode with one of the best examples of non-intuitive pronunciation: Newquay. Make sure you check the spelling of all these places by reading the transcript, but especially this one: Newquay. That’s another coastal town in the south of England.

So I want to know: which one surprised you the most? I think for me, it was Newquay. Please let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!

 

Vocabulary

 

get up to speed on (something) = se atualizar, ficar sabendo sobre (alguma coisa)

 

Como falo em inglês: Ele tá me esnobando

How are you?

Hoje eu falo sobre dois idioms para usar quando alguém está dando aquela ignorada em outra pessoa.

Observação: repare em como eu pronuncio o nome Anthony no podcast. Apesar de ele ter o TH, frequentemente é pronunciado no Reino Unido como faço aqui: com o som regular de T (como em Tony) e não TH (como em Kathy).

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

[audio:http://media.blubrry.com/podcast_ingls_online/www.inglesonline.com.br/mp3/podcast-frosty.mp3]

Transcrição

How are you? You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy!

So let’s say you arrive at your friend Anthony’s birthday party and you see some friends and you say hi to them, obviously, and then you see a few people you know – not very well, they’re not close friends; they’re acquaintances but you greet them as well, of course… So you decide to approach this little circle of people you know – it’s two of your good friends, plus Sally who you’ve seen before and even exchanged a few words with but.. whom you don’t know really well. She seems nice anyway, so, no worries there.

So you go ahead and say hi to your friends, and Sally, ask them what they’ve been up to and stuff, and after a minute or so you notice that Sally is a bit frosty towards you. She didn’t really say hi back when you greeted her and she’s avoiding eye contact. She’s being a bit frosty.

Have you ever experienced that? And I’m not talking about shyness.. obviously some people aren’t naturally warm because they may be shy or very reserved. Sometimes you just know that that’s not the case, though. You’ve talked to this person before and you know they’re nice, and they’ve been warm towards you, and you can’t remember doing anything that might have upset them so you’re now a bit puzzled by their treatment. You can tell that this person is being frosty.

And then, let’s say you’re at the same party and you bump into two of your older friends, John and Alice. John greets you warmly; Alice, not so much. She says hi and quickly excuses herself without another word. Throughout the night, she always seems to be deep in conversation with someone else every time you approach her. You can tell Alice is giving you the cold shoulder.

She’s kind of snubbing you slightly; she’s acting indifferent towards you. She’s giving you the cold shoulder. You don’t feel particularly popular at Anthony’s birthday party tonight, obviously… First it’s Sally acting a bit frosty, and now it’s Alice giving you the cold shoulder. In Alice’s case, though, you have a pretty good idea of why she’s behaving like that.

Alice is your ex-girlfriend, and you guys broke up over a year ago, and you thought she was fine. All this time you’ve gotten along great and you definitely thought she was over you. So, what happened? Well, you started dating again a couple of weeks ago. You’re going out with a different girl now, and you know how it is within a group of friends… News travels fast. Alice must have caught wind of it and now she’s avoiding you.

I think everyone listening to this podcast can relate. Can you remember a time when someone acted a bit frosty towards you and gave you the could shoulder for a while? Why did they do that? Did the two of you end up getting back on good terms?

Let me know in the comments about what happened and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • frosty
  • cold shoulder

 

Vocabulary

you’re puzzled = você está confuso/a

she was over you = ela tinha te esquecido (romanticamente)

catch wind of (something) = ficar sabendo de (alguma coisa)

get back on good terms with someone = ficar de bem, fazer as pazes ou voltar a falar com alguém

Podcast: Do you cook a lot?

Hi, everybody.

Hoje eu falo sobre comida e talvez você ouça alguns ingredientes cuja tradução para o português você não conhece exatamente (ou talvez não!) Veja o vocabulário no fim do post para ter ajuda.

Observação: Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

[audio:http://media.blubrry.com/podcast_ingls_online/www.inglesonline.com.br/mp3/podcast-avocado.mp3]

Transcrição

Hi, everybody. You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy!

So, how are you doing today? It’s a sunny morning out here where I am, and I feel like talking about something that’s a bit unusual for me. Maybe not for most other people but a bit unusual for me, which is food, and cooking a little bit. See, I don’t usually cook much and the people I’ve met here in London are always a bit surprised when I tell them I don’t cook much.

And the reason I don’t cook much isn’t necessarily that I don’t like cooking; it’s just that I end up doing other things with my time and cooking doesn’t make it as a priority. That is absolutely helped by two things: the fact that fortunately I’m able to find pre-packaged food in supermarkets that is of good quality and tastes nice, and the fact that I usually eat very simple things.

For example, for the longest time I had a version of fish and chips for dinner. I say “a version” because the true fish and chips, the one you get at a pub, is a much bigger and heavier portion of food than the one I get at the supermarket. The one from the supermarket is a much smaller chunk of fish, coated in breadcrumbs, with potato wedges. Sort of like what we call “peixe à milanesa com batata frita”, but potato wedges are chunkier than French fries. Click on the link I’ve included here to see what potato wedges look like. So that was all I had for dinner for the longest time, with a bit of lime juice and salt, and I loved it.

Other times I cook a little bit: I make rice with sultanas and steamed broccoli with garlic, and this is one of my favourite things ever to eat. I think I could eat that most nights and be happy. By the way, sultanas are “white” raisins, although they’re not really white… They’re just a bit less dark then regular raisins I suppose. I also make salad regularly – green leaves, tomato and store-bought dressing, but that doesn’t really count as cooking, does it?

So lately I’ve gone back to eating avocado in the form of guacamole. Again, very simple food and simple to make. So a few weeks ago, for the first time in a long time, I smashed one half of a ripe avocado, added in a bit of chopped tomatoes and onion, a little salt, a squeeze of lime and… that was it. That’s what I remembered of the recipe and let me tell you, it was quite bland. Pretty blah.

Obviously, that was not how I remembered good guacamole to taste like. I searched online and found a recipe titled “The best guacamole ever”. Perfect – that’s exactly what I wanted. So obviously the ingredients I was already using were there – avocado, onion, tomato, lime juice and salt; but here’s my mistake: I was completely overlooking all the different kinds of pepper that go into a guacamole… and garlic.

So I got that sorted immediately – went to the shop and got some red chili, cayenne and black pepper. I didn’t have any of those ’cause I rarely ever put pepper on my food. So the next time I made the guacamole I added in all that pepper, and also added some minced garlic.

It turned out great – full of flavour and picante! I suggest you give it a try if you’ve never had guacamole before. It’s basically avocado, tomatoes, onion, lime juice, garlic and a bunch of peppers. Very yummy… and healthy to boot.

That’s it for today – tell me what you’ve been cooking in the kitchen.. Rice, beans, chicken, vegetables? I want to know. Tell us in the comments, and talk to you next time!

 

Vocabulary

chunk = pedaço

chunkier = mais grossa (espessura)

breadcrumbs = migalhas de pão, usadas também para fazer ‘milanesa’

steamed = no vapor

bland = sem gosto, sem graça

blah = mais ou menos, sem graça, não muito bom (informal)

red chili = pimenta malagueta (no geral)

cayenne pepper = pó de pimentas vermelhas (tipo malagueta)

black pepper = pimenta do reino

minced = picadinho em pedaços bem pequenos

to boot = ainda por cima

 

Receita: Best guacamole ever

Como falo em inglês: a intenção dele foi boa

 What’s up, everyone?

Hoje eu falo sobre as intenções de alguém em inglês. Como dizer a intenção dele foi boa, ou de boas intenções o inferno está cheio? Confira também duas expressões para dizer “falar bem de alguém” neste episódio.

Observação: Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

[audio:http://media.blubrry.com/podcast_ingls_online/www.inglesonline.com.br/mp3/podcast-intentions.mp3]

Transcrição

What’s up, everyone? You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Thank you for telling everyone you know about this podcast and, enjoy!

So you know when someone behaves in a way that ends up doing more harm than good, but you just know they had the best intentions when doing so? They were just trying to help; they really meant well. You know this person is well-meaning. When someone is well-meaning, that means they… mean well.

However, you were there when they did what they did or said what they said and you know that the end result wasn’t that great. Rather than being mad at them, though, you’re just lamenting the sad outcome. You know that their heart was in the right place.

So that’s our first idiom of today: their heart was in the right place when they did that or said whatever. It may not have helped, it may even have made matters a bit worse, but… in the end, their heart is in the right place. You may just need to have a quick word with them to maybe make them aware of the effect of their actions.

For example: Steve offered to put in a good word for you with his boss, knowing that you’re coveting a new position in his department. He goes ahead and does just that: he tells his boss you’re great to work with, and very competent too. However, he goes and says that you’ve been doing an awesome job in project XYZ, which is a top secret project that you’re not supposed to be talking about to other people.

So now Steve has basically made clear to his boss that you can’t keep your mouth shut. Great. That kinda ruins the whole point of talking you up to the boss. You were sure Steve knew that project XYZ was confidential. Maybe he didn’t. Anyway, you have known Steve for years now and you know he’s a good guy. You know he would never do anything to harm your chances at getting that job. You just know that his heart is in the right place. He screwed up a little, but his heart is in the right place.

…Which leads me to the second one of today’s episode – I guess we can call this one a proverb: the road to hell is paved with good intentions. Obviously, people often mean well but end up doing bad things or even wreaking havoc sometimes. We say something very similar in Brazil, don’t we? However I could never work out whether that saying applies to someone who really meant well; someone whose heart is in the right place but ends up making things worse.

Now that I’m thinking about it, I think that’s exactly the case and that is how this saying came about: good intentions that end up causing trouble. The road to hell is paved with good intentions. And, as we do in Brazil, you can say that proverb in order to imply that someone knew full well what they were doing when they were “trying to help”, so to speak. Basically you’re accusing them of not being honest: “So Jane, now I know why you offered to bring me lunch. You were trying to give me food poisoning! This sandwich is the worst thing I’ve ever had.” And you finish your rant by telling your colleagues “The road to hell is paved with good intentions. Beware of Jane and her lunch runs.”

So I guess we can all think of great examples of people who meant well but ended up making things worse. Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • someone’s heart is in the right place
  • the road to hell is paved with good intentions

 

Vocabulary

put in a good word for you with = falar bem de você para

coveting = querendo, desejando

talk someone up = falar bem de alguém

mean well = ter/tem boas intenções

wreak havoc = arruinar, causar muito problema

work out = figure out

lunch run = a ida até algum lugar de comida pra comprar o almoço pro grupo/pessoal do escritório

beware of = cuidado com

 

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