Arquivo para categoria Podcast Inglesonline

Podcast com dicas de idioms e phrasal verbs de inglês intermediário em áudio.

Como falo em inglês: Ele se comportou como criança mimada

Hi, all.

Hoje eu falo sobre idioms muito comuns aqui no Reino Unido, e que ouvi recentemente por causa do que aconteceu numa saída em grupo. Não perca!

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

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Transcrição

Hi, all. You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today I’m telling you what happened at a recent group outing.

Thank you for listening and for telling everyone you know,  and enjoy the podcast!

So you know when you get together with a friend and you catch each other up on what you’ve been up to… That’s what my friend Yasmin and I did about a week ago. So Yasmin was telling me that back in November her friend Sofia organised an outing on a Friday night. And here’s the first piece of vocabulary I’d like to highlight for our episode today: organise an event, organise an outing and so on. That’s what a British person will say when he or she is the one planning the event.

I’ll give you an example: a few weeks ago I organised dinner for a few friends of mine. I texted everyone with potential dates, heard back from them and settled on the final date. Then I called the pizza place, made a reservation and texted everyone back with the details. So I organised dinner for us, and later that evening my friends said “Thank you for organising”. This is more of a British way of saying it – I guess in the US you’d say something like “plan dinner” rather than organise.

So anyway, Yasmin’s friend Sofia organised an outing for herself, her boyfriend John, Sofia and two other people. So that was a total of 5 people. They went to a new pub in the neighbourhood, and once there they found a table and grabbed some drinks. Sofia, however, was disappointed that there was no dance floor. She really wanted to dance that night, and she was expecting to find a good dance floor and some nice music.

My friend Yasmin told me that the rest of the group was actually pleased with the pub, Yasmin included. Sofia wouldn’t let it go, though. She insisted on moving the party to a different pub with a dance floor, but by then it was already 10pm and no one really felt like leaving. Well, Sofia decided to go anyway – so she left and John, her boyfriend, went with her.

About a half hour later Sofia texted Yasmin, asking her to go to the other pub. Yasmin texted back saying she didn’t really feel like going as she was having a good time with the two other girls. Sofia insisted, saying that John was – listen to this – in a strop, and if Yasmin came over his mood might improve. To be in a strop means to be moody, to be in a bad mood. It’s British slang – never heard that in the US.

So basically Sofia wanted Yasmin to get to the second pub ’cause she thought John’s mood would improve – that’s because Yasmin and John have been friends for years. John was in a strop… And here’s another idiom my friend used to describe the situation – she said “Sofia told me John was throwing his toys out of the pram”. What does “pram” mean? A pram is a stroller – a four-wheeled sort of chair where you put a baby – and then you push it, of course! So the baby will often have toys in the pram, right? And when the baby has a strop and wants to throw a little tantrum, he or she will start throwing their toys out of the pram.

So when Yasmin told me that John was throwing his toys out of the pram, what she meant was, John was being immature and behaving like a child – maybe throwing a little temper tantrum. I think we all can think of examples when someone we know behaved like an immature child and threw their toys out of the pram.

Please let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • organise (an event, an outing)
  • be in a strop
  • throw toys out of the pram

 

Vocabulary

a group outing = uma saída em grupo

catch someone up (on something) = atualizar alguém (sobre algo); contar as novidades a alguém (sobre algo)

Podcast: Getting a refund at the store

Hey, you guys.

Hoje eu conto a confusão que aconteceu numa loja aqui na hora de buscar os pedidos que fiz pela Internet. Enjoy…

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

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Transcrição

Hey, you guys. You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today I’ll tell you about a mix-up at the store where I was supposed to collect my online orders.

So this is obviously our last episode of 2016 (two thousand sixteen) and I wanted you to hear about something that happened to me in the past couple of weeks. It’s nothing really out of the ordinary – not that it should happen all the time, hopefully it won’t. But it can happen to anyone, though, and it’s a bit of a departure from our usual content about shopping, which is usually, you know “How much is it?”, “Here’s your change” and so on.

Here’s what happened: there’s a store chain here in the UK called Wilko. I guess in Brazil the closest thing to Wilko would be Lojas Americanas. So, it was the second week of December and I realised I needed some cleaning wipes for my cell phone. Simple as that, my cell phone was getting dirty and I needed to clean it, so I went to Wilko and looked for wipes. No luck: they were out of cleaning wipes. That same day I went online and ordered the wipes to be delivered at my local store. Total of the order: £1.50.

The next day I decided to buy a nice box of chocolates I’d seen at Wilko a few weeks before. However, I already knew my local Wilko store was out of that because I checked last time I was there. So I went online again and placed a second order for the box of chocolates. That one cost me £8.

Every online store in the UK accepts PayPal as a payment method, right? So I paid for both orders using my PayPal account. It’s just easier than typing my card info every time. So right away my bank statement showed two charges by PayPal: one for £1.50 (one pound, fifty p) and another for £8.

So a week or so went by and I got a call from Wilko saying my stuff had arrived. They didn’t really say which order so I just assumed both of them were there. So I headed over to Wilko and then to the Customer Service counter, and gave them my name. The lady behind the counter went to the back of the store and only came back, like, ten minutes later, empty-handed. My stuff wasn’t there! Neither the cleaning wipes nor the chocolate box.

She asked me to wait a few more minutes so she could search for the products in the store. Then, she came back with the wipes, which were fortunately in stock now, but they were still out of the chocolates. So she just apologised for how long it was taking, and then I told her that I had actually changed my mind. Instead of waiting for the chocolate to arrive, I would cancel the order and take a refund. So right then and there, she asked me for my card and proceeded to credit my account with £8.

It should all have been done and finished right then – but it wasn’t. So just last week I got another call from Wilko saying my order had arrived! What? Anyway, I ended up forgetting about it until yesterday, when I looked at my bank statement and saw that Wilko had charged me for £8, again. Some kind of mix-up, for sure.

So today I swung by my local Wilko shop again in the hopes I’d be able to sort this all out and get a second refund. This time a guy spoke to me and I explained what happened. He said my refund should have come from PayPal, since it was my chosen method of payment for the order. So he rang some PayPal person and asked them to process my refund. And PayPal has now sent me an email saying the refund is being processed. So I guess that lady was maybe a bit hasty in giving me a refund through the store system rather than having PayPal do it.

So there you go everyone, rather than doing a whole episode reminiscing about our year together and talking about the highlights of 2017 – you got my refund story. This is useful stuff – I promise :) so enjoy.

Happy holidays and talk to you next year!

 

Vocabulary

a mix-up = uma confusão onde alguém achou que uma coisa era outra, o que era dessa pessoa era de outra, etc.

fifty p = fifty pence (pence é o plural de “penny”, o centavo inglês)

swung by = passado de ‘swing by’, ou ‘dar um pulo em (algum lugar)’

reminisce = lembrar e falar sobre algo que algo que já passou

she was a bit hasty in = ela foi um pouco apressada em

so there you go = então aí está / então é isso

 

Podcast: Tea and remaining calm!

Hey, everybody.

Hoje eu falo sobre um aspecto cultural super relevante dos ingleses! Não perca.

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

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Transcrição

Hey, everybody. You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today I’m talking about a cultural trait of English people.

Please download our Android app and leave a comment about this podcast at the iTunes store. Thank you very much and enjoy the podcast!

Today I’m going to tell you about something quite interesting – a cultural aspect of English people. So I dedicate this episode to all the listeners who are really curious about different cultures and, as for the rest of you… Keep listening ’cause there’s some good English here and you can never listen to too much good English.

So check this out: like most of you, I own a smartphone, right? And guess what – we get scam calls here in the United Kingdom as well. I know… Shocker. Scam calls are basically made by dishonest people who would like to steal your money, so they will tell you a lie hoping that you’ll either give them money or disclose personal information that they will use to swindle you out of your hard-earned cash.

So this week I received a message from my cell phone carrier warning about scam callers. After a brief introduction, they laid out the steps to beating the scammers, and that’s where this gets really interesting. I’m going to read them out to you:

First, hang up: Think calmly about what you are being told, ask yourself if it makes sense. Don’t give out any personal details. If it feels wrong, hang up. Then, call back: If the caller claimed to be from a company, call the official number (not the number you were called by) and ask whether they’ve called you. If they didn’t, they can help you report it.

Good advice, right? I mean, hang up, then try to call the company to find out whether they have really tried to contact you or not… That’s sensible advice and it could have been offered by a responsible company from any country, really.

But… that wasn’t all. I omitted step #2 on purpose, because that’s something only the English would say. Yes, there’s one more bit of advice between step #1, “Hang up and think calmly”, and step #3, “call the official number of the company”. Here’s step #2: Make tea: Making a cup of tea is the perfect opportunity to get away from the phone, pause and reflect on what to do next.

Only then, after you’ve made tea and calmly reflected, do they recommend that you try and contact the company. I’ve talked a little bit about tea and British people – if you’ve read my post you now know I wasn’t exaggerating when I said tea is a very important matter in this country and is seriously woven into the fabric of British society.

But there’s a reason why the company brought up “tea” in their advice – they’re telling their clients to reflect and think camly about what to do next. This is a very, very English way to behave. You guys, you have no idea how calm English people generally are at all times. Things that, communicated to the average Brazilian, would make them pull their hair out are met with a pensive look when relayed to an English person – that means they’re taking it in and trying to think about it rationally. Being rational, reacting calmly and not letting your emotions overtake you are traits that are highly valued by people out here.

That’s why only in England would you see a step 2 like the one I got on this email – a step that combines tea and calm reflection in the face of a problem.

That’s it for today – hope you’ve enjoyed today’s episode. Let me know either way and if you have your own ideas on how to react to scam callers – let me know in the comments and talk to you next time!

 

the original message (excerpt)

 

cia-telefonica-ingles

 

Vocabulary

“I know… Shocker” = expressão sarcástica (como “que surpresa, não?”)

swindle you out of (money) = trapacear, enganar você e roubar (dinheiro)

cell phone carrier = empresa de telefonia celular/móvel

sensible = com bom senso

they’re taking it in = eles estão absorvendo, “processando” aquilo que foi dito

relay = (nesse caso) passar uma informação (a alguém)

Como falo em inglês: Esclarecer as coisas e ficar numa boa

Hi, everyone.

Hoje eu falo sobre três idioms da língua inglesa que eu ouço toda hora vendo TV aqui. Confira!

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

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Transcrição

Hi, everyone. You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today I’m going to tell you about three terms, or idioms, that I hear all the time when I watch reality shows on British telly.

Please download our Android app and leave a comment about this podcast at the iTunes store. Thank you very much and enjoy the podcast!

So today I’m going to tell you about three idioms that I hear all the time watching shows with groups of friends… Especially some reality shows that involve, you know, groups of people that know each other, and they spend lots of time together, and… um, they’re friends but there’s a lot of drama, and people fight and make up… In other words, your run-of-the-mill reality show.

So the first one is when someone says “It’s not my place to say this or that to so-and-so”. Well, first of all, “so-and-so” is a generic term for an unspecified person. It’s like when we say “fulano” in Brazil. Back to our expression, it’s not my place. Its meaning is probably pretty straightforward, but let me give you an example: imagine you have a group of friends and then, one day, two people in this group have a fight.

Since you are particularly close to the two people involved in the disagreement, the other friends in the group ask you if you’re going to have a word with them to try and get them to make up. And you say “No, I’m not. It’s not my place to say anything. This is between the two of them.”

I think it’s very common to say this when there’s a fight between girlfriend and boyfriend, for example. Usually friends of the couple will say “It’s not my place to tell Mary that I think Richard did nothing wrong” or “It’s not my place to tell her what I heard about her boyfriend.” And like I said, I hear this a lot on reality shows but make no mistake – people outside of the television world use this a lot. This is very common in everyday conversation.

Our second idiom of today is an interesting one and it is really about people taking sides when there’s a disagreement between two people they know. People have rows all the time in reality shows, and their mutual friends will tend to take the side of the person they’re closest to. For example: John and Richard had a row, and Mary is taking Richard’s side on this one. She says “My loyalty lies with Richard; I’ve known him the longest.” That’s usually how it goes on the shows I’ve watched – if you’ve been friends with Richard for 5 years and friends with John for only a year, then your loyalty lies with Richard because you’ve known him longer than you’ve known John.

So sometimes the person who had a row with your friend will approach you and try to get your support, and you’ll say “Look, my loyalty lies with so-and-so.” What that means is, you’re saying you have your friend’s back. You’re on your friend’s side so you’re not going to side with this person.

And here’s our third idiom, which is also related to rows and disagreements. After two people have a disagreement, one of them will approach the other in order to talk and clear the air. Clear the air means make peace, at least superficially, so that they can be civil to each other when they’re in the same room. People don’t always clear the air in real life after having disagreements, right? But in the reality shows I watch that seems to be part of the cycle every time. This is the cycle: things are said, word spreads, people tell other people what was said about them, people fight, then they bump into each other and clear the air… so that they can have a new row in the future – seriously, that’s like 80% of what goes on in these shows.

I’m curious about your opinion on the topic. Do you usually clear the air with someone when you’ve had a disagreement with them, for example? Please let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • not (someone’s) place
  • (someone’s) loyalty lies with
  • clear the air

 

Vocabulary

telly = television (gíria UK)

run-of-the-mill = (algo) normal, típico

straightforward = fácil de compreender / realizar / etc.

row = (pronunciado “ráu”) briga

word spreads = a notícia se espalha

Como falo em inglês: Eles vão morar juntos

Hello, everybody.

Hoje eu falo sobre idioms super comuns da língua inglesa com a palavra move. Não perca!

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

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Transcrição

Hello, everybody. You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today we talk about idioms with the word move.

Please download our Android app and leave a comment about this podcast at the iTunes store. Thank you very much and enjoy the podcast!

So let’s start today with a simple idiom that we use to tell someone we will soon have a new place of residence. Meaning, the house or apartment we currently live in will no longer be our place of residence. In some time, we will have a new address, and a new place to call home. For example, let’s say that next week I am moving house. I’m not, really, but that’s the idiom, move house.

So I remember when I asked my web developer some time ago to do some work for me and he replied back saying “I’ll be able to do this on Monday. Tomorrow I’m moving house.” As for me, since I came to London I’ve moved house a couple of times. Last time I actually moved into a flat – but that’s how the idiom goes: move house. Last time I moved house was June, this year. By the way – while I was looking for examples around the web I found an article entitled “Is it rude to ask a friend to help you move house?” I guess if it’s a close friend that would be OK. Would you do that – or rather, who would ask to help you move house?

Now, check out our second idiom: move on. If you regularly watch TV shows and films, you have definitely heard this one in phrases like “It’s time to move on”. “He’s moved on”. “You have to move on.” To move on means, essentially, to keep moving forward and it’s usually said in a figurative sense, rather than literally. It’s an expression that will likely come up when someone has just come out of a relationship. Example: John and his girlfriend ended things last month, and his friends have told him he’s got to move on. What does that mean? That means his friends think John should be going out, meeting new people, maybe start going out with someone new. That’s “moving on”.

You can also say move on when you’re having a conversation and you’re done with a certain topic or when you’re at a meeting and – same thing, you’re all done discussing something and it’s time to move on to the next topic.

Our third idiom of today is move in with someone. You’ve heard this one a lot if you watch American shows frequently. When you move in with someone you’re going to share a house or an apartment with them. You’ll probably share expenses as well, as well as every room in the house other than your bedroom – well, sometimes you share a bedroom. It’s very common to hear people say “I’m moving in with my boyfriend” or “My girfriend and I are moving in together”. So, obviously, we’re talking about couples here who, at first, live in separate residences, and eventually decide to live together. It could be that the girl is moving into the guy’s place, or the other way around – the guy is moving into his girlfriend’s place. Or maybe they’ve found a new home and they’re both moving out of their current places and moving in to the new place, together.

Are you familiar with any of our idioms today? Move house, move on, move in? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • move house
  • move on
  • move in

 

Vocabulary

as for me = quanto a mim

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