Arquivo para categoria Podcast Inglesonline

Podcast com dicas de idioms e phrasal verbs de inglês intermediário em áudio.

Podcast: An unexpected turn of events

How’s it going, everyone?  Hoje eu falo sobre algo que aconteceu comigo ontem – e que terminou bem de maneira inesperada.

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Transcrição

How’s it going, everyone? This episode of the Inglês Online podcast is brought to you by iTalki, the convenient, affordable way to get personalised instruction with a native teacher. Click the link on this episode’s page to buy one class for your specific learning needs and get another one free.

ingles turn of events

It was a huge box


Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thank you for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven’t yet left a comment for this podcast, please do so. The more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes.

Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening.

So let’s begin with the phrase turn of events – what does that mean? This phrase is commonly used to express some kind of change in a situation. So we can say, for example, that there was an unexpected turn of events – that’s quite common. Or, an unfortunate turn of events – a situation took a turn for the worse.

That’s not the case for the story I’m gonna tell you, though. It happened just yesterday, and it was certainly an unexpected turn of events, but it was a fortunate one. So what happened was – I just moved into a new place and had to buy a desk and an office chair for my new place. They were supposed to deliver the chair yesterday during work hours, but I didn’t want to stay in all day waiting for the delivery – so I provided instructions to the delivery company: “Please leave the package in the parking lot at the back of the building.”

So I left home in the morning, as I usually do, sat down at a coffee shop and started some work. A couple of hours later I got a text message from the delivery company saying they had made the delivery – and someone at my building had received it and signed for it. The name of the person didn’t really ring a bell – it looked like it had been abbreviated. I thought “Great. I told them to just leave the package at the parking lot, and now someone’s signed for it.” I got immediately suspicious – I don’t know why, but I did. I just could not understand why they needed someone’s signature. I was now fearing that my chair had been stolen and I was gonna have to call up the company and make a complain and all that.

So I decided I’d head over to my place right then since I was a bit worried anyway. When I got there, I thought I’d check the parking lot right away. I’ll admit I feared I’d find no packages whatsoever awaiting. Well, that was my first pleasant surprise: there was a big package right where I had instructed them to leave it. I tried to lift it off the floor but it was too heavy, so I just dragged it along the pavement around my building until I reached the front door.

Now, I live in a building with no elevators – on the first floor, but still… It wasn’t going to be too easy to carry that package over to my place. And that’s when the second unexpected turn of events happened: this nice lady who lives in my building, who I’d never seen before, was just coming out the front door and offered to help me with the package.

It took us about thirty seconds to get to my door. She introduced herself and said that if I needed anything, to just give her a call. So, yeah… what started out as a bit of a worrisome situation for me turned out pretty nicely. That was a nice and unexpected turn of events… At least the events I had running in my head!

Please tell us in the comments about the last time you had an unexpected turn of events in your life, and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • a turn of events

Vocabulary

a situation took a turn for the worse = uma situação piorou, de repente algo ruim aconteceu

pavement = calçada (Reino Unido)

but still = mas ainda assim

 

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Como falo em inglês: Levar na brincadeira

Hi, all!  Hoje eu falo sobre idioms com as palavras jokelaugh.

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

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Transcrição

Hey, everybody. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast.

Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app.

Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven’t yet left a comment for this podcast, please do so. The more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes.

Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening.

Are you able to take a joke? When your friends are having a good laugh at your expense, are you able to join them and have a good laugh yourself? Let’s be frank here: some people are and some people aren’t. Some people are great at taking a joke. They’re able to laugh it off and go on with their business, and not hold a grudge.

There are people, however, that don’t do so well. Maybe because they’re more sensitive, or because of the environment they grew up in, they’re not so great at taking a joke. Some people feel hurt, and it’s best not to make them the butt of any more jokes.

OK – so I’ve just used lots of idioms and collocations related to joking. Let’s break this down and take a closer look at a few of them. My initial question was “Are you able to take a joke?” I’m actually curious and I would like to hear from you guys if you’re usually able to take jokes. That means, in general, that when you’re the butt of a joke, you don’t really care that much.  That’s the expression: butt of the joke.

As you may or may not know, ‘butt’ is a body part. It is our posterior, our derrière (that’s a French word), or, as people say in the UK, our bottom. When someone is the butt of a joke, that means that they’re the object of ridicule with that joke. Whoever told that joke is making fun of that person; that person is the butt of the joke.

So if that person can, in general, take a joke, he or she will be able to laugh it off. Of course, there are jokes and jokes. Some jokes can go too far and sometimes they are truly insults disguised as jokes. However, let’s say we’re talking about a good-natured joke. Let’s say your friend John is the butt of the joke. And let’s say that John is the kind of guy who can take a joke. He’s pretty chilled and has a great sense of humour.

So when your other friends make a joke at John’s expense, he doesn’t care. In fact, he joins in and even laughs with them. John doesn’t mind being the butt of the joke. He can take a bit of ridicule from his friends. The truth is, John knows his friends can take a joke as well.

So when one of you makes a joke at John’s expense, or in other words – when John is the butt of the joke, he just laughs it off. When you laugh something off, that means you’re sort of treating a problem, or an unpleasant situation, as something unimportant… and you’re showing that it’s not that important by laughing at it.

Now, tell me the truth: can you take a joke? Do you get hurt every time you’re the butt of the joke? Let me know in the comments and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • take a joke
  • butt of the joke
  • laugh it off

Vocabulary

at someone’s expense = às custas de alguém

hold a grudge = guardar rancor

Como falo em inglês: Estou só apagando incêndio

Hey, everybody.  Hoje eu falo sobre idioms do inglês com a palavra fire.

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

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Transcrição

Hey, everybody. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast.

Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app.

Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven’t yet left a comment for this podcast, please do so. The more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes.

Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening.

ingles: idioms com fireSo today we start with the English saying “where there’s smoke, there’s fire.” We say the exact same thing in Brazil. Where there’s smoke, there’s fire. That’s what we think when it looks like something’s wrong, or when we hear a rumour about something and we’re not able to tell a hundred percent whether it’s true or not… but we do tend to believe that there’s something there.

Most people do become suspicious when they hear a rumour, I guess. They say ‘where there’s smoke, there’s fire’. That’s why a well-known strategy by some politicians is to create rumours about opponents and spread them, because even though they’re false people will usually think that there’s at least a grain of truth in them. Where there’s smoke, there’s fire.

Let’s move on to another idiom with the word fire – again, we say basically the exact same thing in Brazil. Very, very common to hear people who work in offices and are very busy with their daily attributions, and when you ask them “How’s it going?” they’ll answer “Oh, you know. Putting out fires all they long.” Listen again: I’m putting out fires.

If you’ve ever worked in an office in Brazil, I’m sure you’ve heard people say the Portuguese version of that. When you have to deal with emergencies or things that are urgent, rather than your daily tasks, you’re putting out fires. This could be you! I mean, what did you do in the office yesterday?

Did you have to handle last minute, urgent requests from your boss? Did you spend considerable time trying to fix some kind of unexpected issue with a client, a supplier, your computer? Did you spend so much time putting out fires that you didn’t even have a chance to read your e-mails? I think everyone can relate. I mean, I’m self-employed – I work for myself, and some days I spend hours putting out fires.

I remember one day, a couple of years ago. I was getting ready to write a few blog posts when I started to get messages from readers telling me my website was down. So this wasn’t just any small fire I had to put out, it was a big one. I remember it took me a few days to get the situation under control – in the end I had to find a different hosting service for Inglês Online and until I got that sorted I simply could not get ahead with any writing. Getting the website back up and working properly was way more urgent than getting a new blog post out – so that meant I spent those few days putting out a big fire rather than doing what I do every week, which is write new content.

I’m curious: what’s the last time you had to put out a fire at the office? Or maybe you do that regularly at home (hopefully not literally)? Let me know in the comments and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • where there’s smoke, there’s fire
  • put out fires

 

Como falo em inglês: Tal pai, tal filho

Hi, all.  Hoje eu falo sobre provérbios e idioms  do inglês com a palavra apple.

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

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Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

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Transcrição

Hi, all. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast.

Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app.

Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven’t yet left a comment for this podcast, please do so. The more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes.

Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening.

ingles appleSo, you know how ‘health’ has been a hot topic for years, right? On TV shows, magazines, books, websites, everywhere you look there’s a new study or piece of advice regarding how to keep healthy. Over the years I’ve heard the following saying quite a few times: One apple a day keeps the doctor away. Some people say that because, apparently, apples are so nutritious that if you eat an apple every day, you will never need to go to a doctor.

I mean, obviously that is not completely true. Sure, apples are nutritious, as are all kinds of fruit, I guess. I wish it was that easy, though, right? I don’t know about your apple consumption, but apples are actually not my favourite fruit and I rarely eat one. I do, however, have a bit of apple juice almost every day and that’s because I love a good smoothie. I use apple juice as the base and then I add a banana, some frozen berries, a bit of spinach and flaxseed, and then I blend it all up.

Does that count? I haven’t been sick in a while so I’m gonna say yes. Where do you stand on this piece of advice – one apple a day keeps the doctor away? I sure wish it was mango instead of apple. Back when I lived in Brazil I used to eat mango every single day. Some days I would have as many as three mangoes, I kid you not. Anyway… I don’t think we have a similar saying in Brazil, so there you go – one apple a day keeps the doctor away. Let me know if you think it’s true or not.

And here’s another saying with ‘apple’: the apple does not fall far from the tree. Have you heard this one? We’ve got a similar one in Brazil but I’m not gonna say it because the words we use are different. So we say that the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree when someone behaves the same way as their relatives, especially their father or mother.

So let’s say your father is a very well-organised man. He makes lists, he knows where everything is and when you need an old document, you can count on him to still have a copy of that old document in one of his desk drawers. And your brother happens to be the exact same. Very organised. His desk is never messy. Keeps copies of old bills. The documents in his folders are alphabetically sorted. What can you say? The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.

Your mom loves make-up and has a huge collection of make-up items. Your sister is the same – loves putting on make-up and watching YouTube videos to learn new techniques. The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.

So tell me: can you apply this saying to… maybe one of your parents and you? Are you just like your mom when it comes to hobbies, or studying, or something? Let me know in the comments and talk to you next time!

 

Key expressions

  • One apple a day keeps the doctor away
  • The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree

 

Vocabulary

I kid you not = fora de brincadeira

Como falo em inglês: fiz meu imposto de renda

Hello, you guys.  Hoje eu falo sobre vocabulário de imposto de renda em inglês.

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

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Transcrição

Hello, you guys. This is the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast.

Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app.

Thanks for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven’t yet left a comment for this podcast, please do so. The more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes.

Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening.

So did you file a tax return earlier this year? I did, on the 29th of April – the final deadline for online tax returns in Brazil. Listen again: file a tax return. A tax return is a form – and it can be a paper form, or an online form – where you, the taxpayer, state your income and other information about your life, every year. That’s the way people talk about this – in other words, that’s the collocation: file a tax return.

Then, after you’ve filled out that form with your information, you submit it to the tax authorities and then, you either have to pay taxes, or you get a tax refund in case you’ve already paid in excess. If you’re an employee at a company, you probably have part of your salary deducted every month, and that goes to the government, right? That’s called withholding tax.

So when you finally file your tax return, you may actually realise that the amount of withholding tax you’ve already paid is higher than the amount you actually owe the government. So that is one example of a situation where you would get a tax refund.

This year, in the United States, the tax deadline fell on April 18th. That was the deadline to file tax returns with the IRS, or Internal Revenue Service. The IRS would be equivalent to Receita Federal in Brazil. In the United Kingdom, depending on how you choose to submit your tax return,  the deadline for submitting it will be different. Paper tax returns need to be filed by October 31st, whereas the deadline for filing online is three months later – January 31st.

In Brazil we have the exact same options, right? We can file our tax returns online or in paper form. I don’t remember ever filing paper tax returns. I’ve always submitted online returns, usually on or one day before the deadline… What about you? Have you been filing paper tax returns for years and refuse to do it online?

I remember when I was a regular employee at a company and every year, after doing my taxes, I would get a refund. That was because of all the withholding tax that had been deducted from my monthly paychecks. Now that I work for myself, it’s a different story. I’m always paying taxes – no refund.

So what’s it like for you? Are you an employee who gets a refund every year? Are you self-employed and you end up paying taxes every month, or every year? Let me know in the comments and talk to you next time!

 

Key expressions

  • file a tax return
  • taxpayer
  • tax refund
  • withholding tax
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