Arquivo para categoria Podcast Inglesonline

Podcast com dicas de idioms e phrasal verbs de inglês intermediário em áudio.

Podcast: Highly unusual

What’s up?  Hoje eu falo sobre combinações perfeitas entre advérbios e adjetivos, usadas pelos nativos todos os dias.

Confira!

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Transcrição

What’s up? You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today I’m talking about adverbs that go really well with adjectives, also known as adverb-adjective collocations.

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So today I’m talking about adverb-adjective collocations… ugh. Kidding, it’s not boring, really, ’cause it’s not a grammar lesson. I only mentioned “adverb-adjective” so you have a reference for what the general topic is for this episode. Let’s get right into it with the first example: instead of saying someone was aware of something, you can say that person was fully aware of what was going on. Let’s say we’re talking about a guy named Jack here.

So Jack wasn’t just aware. Jack was fully aware of, let’s say, the sales meeting that happened this morning. It’s not like he just heard something about the meeting in passing. No, he had all the details. He got an in invitation to the meeting, and RSVP’ed yes. Jack was fully aware of the sales meeting this morning.

Fully aware is used instead of just “aware” when, obviously, you want to emphasise that someone knew full well that something was going to happen and so on. It’s a handy expression when people are trying to avoid taking responsibility for something or when they want to pretend they had no idea something was going on. In those cases you say “Nope, you were fully aware this was going on.”

And that’s why “fully aware” is a collocation. That’s how people speak. That’s the combination of words native speakers use. They don’t say, for example, “You are wholly aware” or “entirely aware”. Are these wrong? Nope. People will get it, they just don’t use them – at least not often.

Here’s another one: if you think Inglês Online is going anywhere, you are sadly mistaken. That means, you are completely mistaken. You think English is impossible to learn? You’re sadly mistaken. It’s just that you haven’t been trying to learn it the right way. If you think we don’t have sunny days in London you’re sadly mistaken. We have plenty of sunny days out here.

And how about when someone’s really shy? We can say he or she is painfully shy. Tony can’t speak to a room full of people. He gets very uncomfortable at a party – he’s painfully shy. I found this example on Twitter – a girl wrote “I hate how sometimes I am incredibly outgoing then sometimes I am painfully shy”. Can you relate?

Let me talk about the word ‘unusual’ now. I like this word. Instead of saying that something is strange, you can just say it’s unusual. That means it’s something that doesn’t happen very often, it’s unexpected and so on. You can emphasise that, saying something is highly unusual. You hear this often in movies and TV shows when someone’s sort of apologising or trying to explain why something didn’t go as planned. They might say “Everything seemed to be under control and then, all of a sudden, the engine exploded. That is highly unusual.” You know what else is highly unusual? How hot it is today here in London. The windows are open and I’m sweating, people.

So here’s the last one to wrap up this episode: a nice way to say that something costs an arm and a leg. Here’s my example: sometimes I go to the supermarket to buy food and when I look at the price tag I immediately change my mind. Frozen food can be ridiculously expensive. It’s just cheaper to make it yourself. I bet you guys can find several examples of stuff that’s ridiculously expensive where you live. Cars, imported products, seafood in some areas and the list goes on. When you say that something is ridiculously expensive, that usually means you have no intention of paying for it.

I wanna hear your examples – let me know, and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • highly unusual
  • painfully shy
  • ridiculously expensive
  • fully aware
  • sadly mistaken

 

Vocabulary

in passing = casualmente

RSVP’ed = deu um RSVP (=resposta a um convite confirmando presença ou ausência)

is going anywhere = vai deixar de existir

costs an arm and a leg = custa os olhos da cara

Podcast: Idioms com GOLD

Hey, everyone.  Hoje eu falo sobre alguns idioms do inglês com a palavra gold. Confira!

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Transcrição

Hey, everyone. This episode of the Inglês Online podcast is brought to you by iTalki, the convenient, affordable way to get personalised instruction with a native teacher. Click the link on this episode’s page to buy one class for your specific learning needs and get another one free.

Pgold ingleslease download our Android app or leave a comment about this podcast at the iTunes store. Thank you very much and enjoy the podcast!

So today we have a few idioms with the word gold. I remember that, a number of years ago, someone referred me to a web developer and said, “He’s gold.” That’s quite a compliment. My friend said that the web developer was gold. That means he thinks the guy is great, has lots of qualities – he is gold.

So that one’s very easy. Here’s another idiom that you’ll hear a lot when you watch American movies and TV shows: gold digger. Gold digger. It’s usually applied to women, but it could be said of anyone, really, who gets in a relationship with someone wealthy, so that they’ll benefit from all that wealth.

We see that a lot in movies, don’t we? And sometimes in real life as well. A girl starts dating a very rich man that she wouldn’t otherwise date. The guy’s rich, showers her with presents, takes her to expensive restaurants and boat cruises, gives her a lot of jewellery and so on. A lot of people would call that lady a gold digger because, for them, it’s obvious that she would not be with that man if it weren’t for his wealth. So that’s a gold digger.

Let’s change the tune a little bit – our next idiom is strike gold. When someone strikes gold, that means something great has happened to that person. Their life has become better in some way. Maybe they hired a new employee for their company and struck gold. Why? Because that new employee turned out to be amazing and your business is doing much better now that you have them on board. You struck gold with this new employee.

Or maybe your friend Jennie bought a second hand car last year and everyone knows by now that she struck gold. She stopped having car troubles when she bought that car. It’s super efficient, reliable, safe, requires little maintenance, easy to park and manoeuvre… Jennie really struck gold with that car.

And let’s wrap up the episode with one more “gold” idiom: a heart of gold. We say that in Brazil, don’t we? It means the same in English. We all know people who have a heart of gold. They’re just good people: generous, caring, giving. Someone with a heart of gold is usually someone who will do good things for others without expecting things in return. They just do stuff out of the goodness of their hearts. When you hear this idiom – heart of gold – is there someone who immediately comes to your mind? Is there someone close to you, or maybe someone you’ve worked with at the same office, who has a heart of gold?

And here’s something else I wanna know – when have you struck gold in your life? Maybe you met someone special a while ago – for a romantic relationship, or simply a friendship – and when you think of that person you feel you’ve struck gold. I certainly feel that way about some people in my life! I wanna hear your stories – let me know, and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • gold (adjective)
  • gold digger
  • strike gold
  • heart of gold

 

Vocabulary

she wouldn’t otherwise date = ela não sairia (com o homem) se a situação fosse diferente (se ele não fosse rico)

now that you have them on board = agora que você tem ele/ela (them é usado aqui para comunicar ele ou ela) na sua equipe

 

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Podcast: Cool as a cucumber

Hi, everybody.  Hoje eu falo sobre os idioms do inglês cool as a cucumber, free as a bird, hot as fire e mais.

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

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Transcrição

Hi, everybody. This episode of the Inglês Online podcast is brought to you by iTalki, the convenient, affordable way to get personalised instruction with a native teacher. Click the link on this episode’s page to buy one class for your specific learning needs and get another one free.

Please download our Android app or leave a comment about this podcast at the iTunes store. Thank you very much and enjoy the podcast!

ingles cool as a cucumberToday let’s take a look at a number of expressions that use an object or an animal to emphasise a quality. For example, cool as a cucumber. “Cool” here means cool-headed, or someone who can keep their cool even when they’re under a bit of pressure, or stress. I like this idiom; I find it funny – I mean, it says that someone is cool as a… cucumber. And of course, I get it, cucumbers feel pretty fresh and cool, but it still sounds funny. So, for example, you might say that, to your surprise, your friend Annie was cool as a cucumber before her job interview. Are you usually cool as a cucumber?

And here’s one I hear a lot: free as a bird. Are you busy Friday night? Nope, free as a bird. There’s a Supertramp song titled ‘Free as a bird’; go ahead and take a listen. It’s a great song. Anyway, if your English-speaking friend says “I’ve got two tickets to see Rihanna. What are you doing tonight?” you can say “I’m free as a bird.”

And here’s another one that’s pretty straightforward: hot as fire. As you may or may not know, the word hot is used to describe someone who’s very attractive, so you’ll see and hear hot as fire being used to describe people very often. Or you can say it about the weather: “It’s hot as fire outside… thirty three degrees.” Or you could use hot as fire for really spicy food, like a mustard sauce that tastes a bit sweet, but is hot as fire.

And how about this one – blind as a bat? Well, I did a little bit of research and it turns out that bats are not really blind; like the rest of us they can’t see in complete darkness so they have a special trick for finding their way in the dark. That’s how the expression goes, though – blind as a bat. One woman tweeted “I just realised that I can no longer sit in the back row of a college lecture hall… I’m blind as a bat.” Obviously she’s exaggerating – she’s not completely blind. Another one said “My grandma used to tell me to eat my carrots because they were good for my eyes but here I am years later, blind as a bat.” I got the same piece of advice when I was a kid – you should eat carrots ’cause they’re good for your eye sight. Hmm… Not sure that’s true.

There are many more idioms like these in the English language. Brave as a lion, busy as a bee, sly as a fox. Which one is your favourite?  Are you blind as a bat when you’re not wearing your glasses? Are you in a relationship now, or are you free as a bird to go out and date? Are you cool as a cucumber when you’re under pressure? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • cool as a cucumber
  • free as a bird
  • hot as fire
  • blind as a bat

 

Vocabulary

straightforward = fácil de entender

mustard sauce = molho de mostarda

sly = ardiloso

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Como falo em inglês: Vou fazer o que você quer, mas com uma condição

What’s up, everyone?  Hoje eu falo sobre como dizer as expressões “passar no farol vermelho” e “com uma condição” em inglês.

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

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Transcrição

inglês passar no vermelhoWhat’s up, everyone? This episode of the Inglês Online podcast is brought to you by iTalki, the convenient, affordable way to get personalised instruction with a native teacher. Click the link on this episode’s page to buy one class for your specific learning needs and get another one free.

Please download our Android app or leave a comment about this podcast at the iTunes store. Thank you very much and enjoy the podcast!

So let me present you this week with a couple of idioms that are, as always, very common and… I heard both of them this week, I don’t remember where. Probably on some TV show or a podcast. And the reason they stuck with me is, we say the exact same thing in Brazil, but with slightly different words. So if we haven’t heard or read these expressions enough and internalised them, guess what… It’s our instinct to kind of translate the words we use in Brazil directly into English, which will basically sound a little off.

So first up we have an expression related to driving, traffic, cars or motorcycles, or other vehicles. It’s a traffic infraction: run a red light. Listen again: someone ran a red light. You know what we’re supposed to do as drivers when we come across a red light: we’re supposed to stop. So when you run a red light, obviously you could cause an accident. And you could get a traffic ticket.

I have run a red light a couple of times in my life, I guess, but I haven’t had a car in a while now so if I were to start driving regularly again I would probably be very careful to not run any red lights. Now, are you a driver? Do you drive every day? Be honest with me: when’s the last time you ran a red light? Did anyone see it? Did you get caught? Did you get a ticket?

Now listen to this: you ask your brother to borrow his car for the afternoon. Your brother says “You can have my car for the afternoon on one condition: return it to me with a full tank of gas.” Did you catch the phrase ‘on one condition’? Notice that in Brazil we say something like “with one condition“… So, forget that and listen again: You can have my car for the afternoon on one condition: return it to me with a full tank of gas.

If you have a daughter, for example, and she asks if she can go to a slumber party at her friend’s house, you could say “You can go on one condition: do your homework first.” And here’s another example: your friend Joe has just done you a big favor. It doesn’t matter what it was; let’s just say he basically made your life a whole lot easier. Joe then gives you a call and invites you to lunch. You say “I’ll go on one condition: this one is my treat.” Listen again: I will go on one condition: it’s my treat.

What are your examples? Talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • on one condition
  • run a red light

 

Vocabulary

 

(something) sounds a little off = (algo) soa meio estranho

if I were to do something = se eu fosse fazer algo

Did you get a ticket? = Você foi multado/a?

a slumber party = quando várias amigas dormem na casa de uma delas

 

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Podcast: An unexpected turn of events

How’s it going, everyone?  Hoje eu falo sobre algo que aconteceu comigo ontem – e que terminou bem de maneira inesperada.

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

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Transcrição

How’s it going, everyone? This episode of the Inglês Online podcast is brought to you by iTalki, the convenient, affordable way to get personalised instruction with a native teacher. Click the link on this episode’s page to buy one class for your specific learning needs and get another one free.

ingles turn of events

It was a huge box


Please subscribe to this podcast using the Podcasts app for iPhone or iPad, or listen to the episodes using the Inglesonline Android app. Thank you for all the comments at the iTunes store and if you haven’t yet left a comment for this podcast, please do so. The more comments for the Inglês Online podcast, the more people will find out about it and listen to the episodes.

Thank you for telling your friends, your neighbours, your family and keep listening.

So let’s begin with the phrase turn of events – what does that mean? This phrase is commonly used to express some kind of change in a situation. So we can say, for example, that there was an unexpected turn of events – that’s quite common. Or, an unfortunate turn of events – a situation took a turn for the worse.

That’s not the case for the story I’m gonna tell you, though. It happened just yesterday, and it was certainly an unexpected turn of events, but it was a fortunate one. So what happened was – I just moved into a new place and had to buy a desk and an office chair for my new place. They were supposed to deliver the chair yesterday during work hours, but I didn’t want to stay in all day waiting for the delivery – so I provided instructions to the delivery company: “Please leave the package in the parking lot at the back of the building.”

So I left home in the morning, as I usually do, sat down at a coffee shop and started some work. A couple of hours later I got a text message from the delivery company saying they had made the delivery – and someone at my building had received it and signed for it. The name of the person didn’t really ring a bell – it looked like it had been abbreviated. I thought “Great. I told them to just leave the package at the parking lot, and now someone’s signed for it.” I got immediately suspicious – I don’t know why, but I did. I just could not understand why they needed someone’s signature. I was now fearing that my chair had been stolen and I was gonna have to call up the company and make a complain and all that.

So I decided I’d head over to my place right then since I was a bit worried anyway. When I got there, I thought I’d check the parking lot right away. I’ll admit I feared I’d find no packages whatsoever awaiting. Well, that was my first pleasant surprise: there was a big package right where I had instructed them to leave it. I tried to lift it off the floor but it was too heavy, so I just dragged it along the pavement around my building until I reached the front door.

Now, I live in a building with no elevators – on the first floor, but still… It wasn’t going to be too easy to carry that package over to my place. And that’s when the second unexpected turn of events happened: this nice lady who lives in my building, who I’d never seen before, was just coming out the front door and offered to help me with the package.

It took us about thirty seconds to get to my door. She introduced herself and said that if I needed anything, to just give her a call. So, yeah… what started out as a bit of a worrisome situation for me turned out pretty nicely. That was a nice and unexpected turn of events… At least the events I had running in my head!

Please tell us in the comments about the last time you had an unexpected turn of events in your life, and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • a turn of events

Vocabulary

a situation took a turn for the worse = uma situação piorou, de repente algo ruim aconteceu

pavement = calçada (Reino Unido)

but still = mas ainda assim

 

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