Arquivo para categoria Podcast Inglesonline

Podcast com dicas de idioms e phrasal verbs de inglês intermediário em áudio.

Como falo em inglês: Esclarecer as coisas e ficar numa boa

Hi, everyone.

Hoje eu falo sobre três idioms da língua inglesa que eu ouço toda hora vendo TV aqui. Confira!

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

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Transcrição

Hi, everyone. You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today I’m going to tell you about three terms, or idioms, that I hear all the time when I watch reality shows on British telly.

Please download our Android app and leave a comment about this podcast at the iTunes store. Thank you very much and enjoy the podcast!

So today I’m going to tell you about three idioms that I hear all the time watching shows with groups of friends… Especially some reality shows that involve, you know, groups of people that know each other, and they spend lots of time together, and… um, they’re friends but there’s a lot of drama, and people fight and make up… In other words, your run-of-the-mill reality show.

So the first one is when someone says “It’s not my place to say this or that to so-and-so”. Well, first of all, “so-and-so” is a generic term for an unspecified person. It’s like when we say “fulano” in Brazil. Back to our expression, it’s not my place. Its meaning is probably pretty straightforward, but let me give you an example: imagine you have a group of friends and then, one day, two people in this group have a fight.

Since you are particularly close to the two people involved in the disagreement, the other friends in the group ask you if you’re going to have a word with them to try and get them to make up. And you say “No, I’m not. It’s not my place to say anything. This is between the two of them.”

I think it’s very common to say this when there’s a fight between girlfriend and boyfriend, for example. Usually friends of the couple will say “It’s not my place to tell Mary that I think Richard did nothing wrong” or “It’s not my place to tell her what I heard about her boyfriend.” And like I said, I hear this a lot on reality shows but make no mistake – people outside of the television world use this a lot. This is very common in everyday conversation.

Our second idiom of today is an interesting one and it is really about people taking sides when there’s a disagreement between two people they know. People have rows all the time in reality shows, and their mutual friends will tend to take the side of the person they’re closest to. For example: John and Richard had a row, and Mary is taking Richard’s side on this one. She says “My loyalty lies with Richard; I’ve known him the longest.” That’s usually how it goes on the shows I’ve watched – if you’ve been friends with Richard for 5 years and friends with John for only a year, then your loyalty lies with Richard because you’ve known him longer than you’ve known John.

So sometimes the person who had a row with your friend will approach you and try to get your support, and you’ll say “Look, my loyalty lies with so-and-so.” What that means is, you’re saying you have your friend’s back. You’re on your friend’s side so you’re not going to side with this person.

And here’s our third idiom, which is also related to rows and disagreements. After two people have a disagreement, one of them will approach the other in order to talk and clear the air. Clear the air means make peace, at least superficially, so that they can be civil to each other when they’re in the same room. People don’t always clear the air in real life after having disagreements, right? But in the reality shows I watch that seems to be part of the cycle every time. This is the cycle: things are said, word spreads, people tell other people what was said about them, people fight, then they bump into each other and clear the air… so that they can have a new row in the future – seriously, that’s like 80% of what goes on in these shows.

I’m curious about your opinion on the topic. Do you usually clear the air with someone when you’ve had a disagreement with them, for example? Please let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • not (someone’s) place
  • (someone’s) loyalty lies with
  • clear the air

 

Vocabulary

telly = television (gíria UK)

run-of-the-mill = (algo) normal, típico

straightforward = fácil de compreender / realizar / etc.

row = (pronunciado “ráu”) briga

word spreads = a notícia se espalha

Como falo em inglês: Eles vão morar juntos

Hello, everybody.

Hoje eu falo sobre idioms super comuns da língua inglesa com a palavra move. Não perca!

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

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Transcrição

Hello, everybody. You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today we talk about idioms with the word move.

Please download our Android app and leave a comment about this podcast at the iTunes store. Thank you very much and enjoy the podcast!

So let’s start today with a simple idiom that we use to tell someone we will soon have a new place of residence. Meaning, the house or apartment we currently live in will no longer be our place of residence. In some time, we will have a new address, and a new place to call home. For example, let’s say that next week I am moving house. I’m not, really, but that’s the idiom, move house.

So I remember when I asked my web developer some time ago to do some work for me and he replied back saying “I’ll be able to do this on Monday. Tomorrow I’m moving house.” As for me, since I came to London I’ve moved house a couple of times. Last time I actually moved into a flat – but that’s how the idiom goes: move house. Last time I moved house was June, this year. By the way – while I was looking for examples around the web I found an article entitled “Is it rude to ask a friend to help you move house?” I guess if it’s a close friend that would be OK. Would you do that – or rather, who would ask to help you move house?

Now, check out our second idiom: move on. If you regularly watch TV shows and films, you have definitely heard this one in phrases like “It’s time to move on”. “He’s moved on”. “You have to move on.” To move on means, essentially, to keep moving forward and it’s usually said in a figurative sense, rather than literally. It’s an expression that will likely come up when someone has just come out of a relationship. Example: John and his girlfriend ended things last month, and his friends have told him he’s got to move on. What does that mean? That means his friends think John should be going out, meeting new people, maybe start going out with someone new. That’s “moving on”.

You can also say move on when you’re having a conversation and you’re done with a certain topic or when you’re at a meeting and – same thing, you’re all done discussing something and it’s time to move on to the next topic.

Our third idiom of today is move in with someone. You’ve heard this one a lot if you watch American shows frequently. When you move in with someone you’re going to share a house or an apartment with them. You’ll probably share expenses as well, as well as every room in the house other than your bedroom – well, sometimes you share a bedroom. It’s very common to hear people say “I’m moving in with my boyfriend” or “My girfriend and I are moving in together”. So, obviously, we’re talking about couples here who, at first, live in separate residences, and eventually decide to live together. It could be that the girl is moving into the guy’s place, or the other way around – the guy is moving into his girlfriend’s place. Or maybe they’ve found a new home and they’re both moving out of their current places and moving in to the new place, together.

Are you familiar with any of our idioms today? Move house, move on, move in? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • move house
  • move on
  • move in

 

Vocabulary

as for me = quanto a mim

Podcast: a tradição britânica Guy Fawkes Night

Hi, you guys. Hoje a gente tem um episódio especial e com vídeo, além de áudio :-) Foi Guy Fawkes Night aqui na Inglaterra (e em todo o Reino Unido, que também inclui Irlanda do Norte, Escócia e País de Gales), e eu fui na comemoração em um pub aqui em Londres. Aproveitei para gravar um vídeo onde a minha amiga Shereena, que é de Londres, explica um pouco sobre qual a razão de ser e como é feita a comemoração.

Só como introdução, você vai ver que Guy Fawkes fez parte de um plano para explodir o Parlamento britânico! Bom, ele foi pego e punido com a pena capital (que hoje não existe mais no UK). Tudo isso aconteceu em 5 de novembro de 1605, e em todo o país até hoje se comemora o fato de que Fawkes não foi bem sucedido em seu plano. É mais ou menos uma “malhação de Judas” não-religiosa e única do Reino Unido: em parques e no interior do país, um boneco (an effigy) representando Guy Fawkes é queimado numa fogueira, enquanto que em vários pubs e outros locais menores há queima de fogos (a fireworks display).

Foi esse último que eu fui assistir em um pub no sul de Londres. Abaixo, você encontra a) o áudio da minha conversa com a Shereena, b) o vídeo da conversa, e c) a transcrição.

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu. Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad. Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

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Assista o vídeo:

Transcrição

(Ana) Hi, you guys. This is for a new episode of the Inglês Online podcast. Tonight I’m here at a pub.. We’re celebrating Guy Fawkes Night, which happens to be a very traditional celebration, or a very traditional day in the UK and I thought it would be nice to let you guys know what this is all about. So I’m here with my friend Shereena, who happens to be a Londoner and she can tell us everything about Guy Fawkes Night. So, I’m gonna ask her right now… This is Shereena! Hi, Shereena…

(Shereena) Hi…

(Ana) So tell us – what is Guy Fawkes Night all about?

(Shereena) So, I don’t know what year it was but, in Britain… I think Britain is the only place where we celebrate Guy Fawkes. And Guy Fawkes tried to blow up Parliament… I don’t think it was just him, I think he’s just the guy that got the bad name. So, there was like, a dozen people. And, um… So, yeah, even though he tried to blow up Parliament, for some reason we celebrate it every year! And… Because there’s a gunpowder connection, we, we use fireworks and, yeah… It’s an excuse to have a party, really.

(Ana) Alright. So… So is this, is this a traditional way to celebrate Guy Fawkes, like, you come to a pub… We watched the fireworks, by the way. There’s like, fireworks everywhere. Is it all across the UK?… for the fireworks display.

(Shereena) Yeah. Yeah, so it’ll be all across the UK. Traditionally it’s gonna be at a park and they’ll have a big bonfire, and they’ll put an effigy of Guy Fawkes at the top and so obviously… kill him off for doing a bad thing. So that’s kind of the tradition. I think the fireworks are… just the gunpowder connection. Yeah.

(Ana) But they don’t do that in London anymore, do they? [estou perguntando se eles não fazem mais a comemoração com a fogueira em Londres]

(Shereena) They do, in the parks. Yeah, they do. It starts off with a bonfire countdown. A countdown just, like… the bonfire, and that’s the kind of, main kind of thing.

(Ana) Alright.

(Shereena) But the fireworks are just the gunpowder connection.

(Ana) OK. So thank you, Shereena.

(Shereena) Thank you, Ana.

(Ana) And… you can either do that, or you can do what we did. Come to a pub, you know, pay five quid and watch the fireworks display. OK, so that’s it for today. I hope you guys enjoyed it and see you next time :-)

 

Vocabulário

which happens to be / who happens to be = que é; que por acaso é

a dozen people = uma dúzia de pessoas

gunpowder = pólvora

five quid = cinco libras (contos, pilas, mangos – é gíria pra libra, e não tem S no plural)

Como falo em inglês: Agora é com você

Hi, all.

Hoje eu falo sobre idioms super comuns do inglês com a palavra ball. Não perca!

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

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Transcrição

idioms-ball-inglesHi, all. You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today we look into idioms with the word ball.

Please download our Android app and leave a comment about this podcast at the iTunes store. Thank you very much and enjoy the podcast!

So let’s get started today with an idiom that you will hear all the time. Seriously, I’m not even exaggerating. Both of our idioms today are actually quite common in the English language and if you’re in the habit of watching American or even British TV shows, you’ve probably heard them many times already.

Just this week I was watching an English reality show and heard our first idiom: the ball is in your court. That means, it’s up to you now. It’s your decision or it is up to you to take the next step. So let’s say I invite my friend Mary to go on a trip to Buenos Aires with me. I tell her that I can book the accommodation and prepare our itinerary. All she has to do is let me know whether she wants to come along!

So now the ball is in her court. It’s her decision, it’s up to her, and once she’s made up her mind she will let me know whether she’s coming or not. The ball is in her court. Here’s one more example: Robert and Dana were boyfriend and girlfriend. They had been in a relationship for two years. One day, they had a fight because… Robert did something that Dana didn’t like. As a result, they broke up.

However, Robert later apologised to Dana and explained why he did what he did. She understood, but still wasn’t sure if she wanted to get back together with him. Robert said “Well, you know how I feel. The ball is in your court now.” That means, it’s up to Dana. It’s her decision. The ball’s in her court.

Now on to our second expression of today… Imagine that you have a favourite band that you love. You’ve got all their albums, you’ve been to their concerts… You’re a huge fan. One day their new CD comes out and when you listen to their new songs you can’t help but feel hugely disappointed. You hardly know what to think! The songs are just… awful! Is this really the band you know and love? More like the band you thought you knew… So your brother wants to know if you like the new CD and you tell him the truth: your favourite band really dropped the ball this time.

They dropped the ball. They failed. They made a mistake – or a series of mistakes. They did not keep up the good work, that’s for sure. Maybe they’re suffering from depression. Maybe they’re having a bad year. Maybe they’re fighting amongst themselves and it’s affecting their creativity. You don’t know what the reason is… But you know this time they dropped the ball.

Imagine you’re working with a team at your company and you’re preparing a sales proposal for a big client. Gary is the salesperson who is going to meet with the client and present the proposal. On the day of the meeting… Gary sleeps through his alarm and misses the appointment. That’s right… When Gary finally gets out of bed, it’s too late. Gary screwed up. He completely dropped the ball on this one. Your company would have closed the deal if Gary had not dropped the ball on the day of the meeting.

Now, what is your example? What’s your story about someone dropping the ball? Was it you who dropped the ball? Let me know in the comments, and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

  • the ball is in your court
  • drop the ball

 

 

Como falo em inglês: Ai, que dor!

Hello, everybody.

Hoje eu falo sobre palavrinhas em inglês chamadas interjections – super comuns e bacanas. Não deixe de conferir!

Para ver e ouvir podcasts de semanas anteriores, clique em Podcast Inglês Online no menu.

Baixe os podcasts no seu aparelho Android com o aplicativo Inglês Online; ou assine os podcasts usando o aplicativo Podcasts para iPhone e iPad.

Você pode também assinar o feed do podcast ou encontrá-lo no iTunes (veja o menuzinho ali ao lado). Enjoy!

Baixe o mp3
Para imprimir a transcrição, clique no ícone da impressora que aparece logo antes do início deste post.

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Transcrição

Hello, everybody. You’re listening to the new episode of the Inglês Online podcast, and today I’m talking about interjections.

Please download our Android app and leave a comment about this podcast at the iTunes store. Thank you very much and enjoy the podcast!

So, you know those little words or phrases that we use… generally at the beginning of a sentence, to express some kind of emotion? Like Wow, what a nice house! Or Ugh… That sucks. So wow and ugh are what we call interjections. We have them in Portuguese as well, obviously, and in every language, probably.

Let’s go through a few today. If someone throws something at you all of a sudden and it hurts, you’ll say Ouch! You can also say the shorter version Ow! That’s quite common. Not “Ai!” though… That’s what we say in Brazil and it doesn’t work in English.

Here’s one I say all the time – very respectfully: Jesus! That, to me, expresses surprise or astonishment. There’s also a shorter, more popular version of that – Jeez! Another one of my favourites is Whoa. I say that a lot, when I’m totally caught by surprise by something or someone. For example, “Whoa. You don’t like chocolate! Are you serious?”

And here’s one we say to agree with what somebody else just said: Amen! Your friend says “I’m so relieved the company’s given us Monday off to watch the Big Brother final” and you say “Amen to that”. Or, your brother says “Thank goodness we didn’t go to the beach today. The weather was awful” and you agree: Amen!

And how about this one – aww… That’s when you think something or someone is cute, adorable, sweet and so on. That’s a very frequent one, and… mostly used by the ladies. If you’re used to watching American TV shows and films, no doubt you’ve heard that one a lot. Let’s say your friend shows you a picture of her new puppy dog, who’s obviously super cute. You go “Aww…” That’s pretty much it.

And here’s one that expresses fear, or a bit of surprise, but with a negative connotation: Yikes! Let’s say your coworker Danny is telling you how, on the way back from his holiday, he got a flat tire and he and his family had to spend the night in a hotel room with cockroaches crawling all over the floor. Yikes!… That is a very suitable reaction to this story. Yikes…

There are so many others that we hear all the time. Goodness! Oh my gosh. Bingo!… when someone gets something right or is spot on. Alright! Anyways… All these little words – can you remember a few? Let me know your examples in the comments, and talk to you next time!

Key expressions

Interjections

 

Vocabulary

is spot on = está precisamente correto (no que disse)

 

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